The 10th International Conference: “Innovation for Development in Learning and Sustainability”

The Learning Teacher Network’s 10th International Conference was held at the five star Sheraton Zagreb Hotel in Zagreb, Croatia on April 16-18, 2015. The title of the conference was ‘Innovation for Development in Learning and Sustainability’.

Welcome Letter to Conference Participants
In order to meet the challenges for the future, education and training need to address the areas of innovation, learning and sustainability. The conference will contribute to the exploration of these perspectives.

Innovative approaches in teaching and learning aim to inspire, challenge and engage all young people in rich and rewarding learning experiences that will equip them with the essential skills and attitudes for life, learning and work in the 21st Century. Education for sustainable development (ESD) is not a particular programme or project, but promotes efforts to rethink educational programmes and systems (both methods and contents) that currently support unsustainable societies.

The conference topic will be introduced by internationally recognized experts in this focal area of the conference, followed by parallel sessions of lectures and workshops led by practitioners and researchers. With deep appreciation of the many colleagues who will present and share their knowledge and experience, we are delighted to announce a conference programme that includes quality sessions given by more than 40 presenters and speakers from 16 countries in Europe and beyond.

Alike the previous conferences, we look forward to welcoming colleagues from all levels of education and training in Europe and beyond to a golden opportunity for gaining new knowledge and sharing experience in a good and friendly atmosphere in an international setting.

We wish you warmly welcome to the 10th International Conference and to Zagreb in April!

Magnus Persson
Zagreb Conference Chair
Network President and Coordinator
The Learning Teacher Network

The Conference Venue

 

The five star Sheraton Zagreb Hotel is located in the city centre, just a stroll away from the main attractions where Zagreb’s history and tradition can be witnessed in museums and galleries, architecture, numerous theatres, lively cafés, and bars.

The bright and spacious venue offers a personal and inviting atmosphere and modern conveniences. The hotel restaurants are recognized for the best of Croatian and international gastronomy.

Accommodation including breakfast for three nights (arrival 16th April, departure 19th April) at the Sheraton is included in the full conference package. The hotel rooms are modern, spatious, and with free WiFi.

Read the Sheraton Zagreb Hotel’s Green Programme

Programme for the Zagreb Conference

Thursday April 16th 2015
Afternoon 13h30/14h00, Optional:
Guided sightseeing in central Zagreb, or
School visit to Osnovna škola I. Mertza

16h45-17h45 Registration of delegates
18h00 Music Performance followed by the Opening Session with Words of Welcome by Honoured guests
– Mr Branko Baričević, Head of the European Commission’s Representation in Croatia
– Mrs Sanja Urek, Head of Department, Education and Teacher Training Agency in Croatia
– Mr Ozren Pavlović Bolf, Head of Department for General Education at the Agency for Mobility and EU Programmes in Croatia
– Prof Charles Hopkins, UNESCO Chair on Reorienting Teacher Education to Address Sustainability, Canada
– Mr Magnus Persson, President of the Learning Teacher Network
19h00 Inspirational Intervention
20h00 Conference Welcome Dinner at the Sheraton Hotel

Friday April 17th 2015
09h00 Plenary: Keynote speech by Mr Riel Miller, Head of Foresight at UNESCO, Paris France: “Education versus Learning: Changing Conceptions of Agency by Using the Future Differently”
10h00 Coffee break
10h30 Parallel sessions A
11h45 Parallel Sessions B
12h45 Lunch
14h00 Parallel Sessions C
15h00 Coffee break
15h30 Parallel Sessions W
16h30 Free time and networking
20h00 Conference Dinner

Saturday April 18th 2015
09h00 Plenary: Keynote speech by Mr Stephen Harris, Executive Director/Founder of the Sydney Centre for Innovation and Learning, Australia:”Future Schooling: Bringing together the key elements for whole school transformation”
10h00 Coffee break
10h30 Parallel Sessions D
11h45 Plenary: Speech by Prof. Olena Pometun, the National Academy of Pedagogical Science of Ukraine and the NGO ‘Teachers for Democracy and Partnership’, Ukraine: “Democracy in and through education: Ukrainian Challenges and Opportunities”
12h45 Lunch
14h00 Parallel Sessions E
15h00 Coffee break
15h30 Round table sessions
16h30 Plenary: Conference Conclusions
16h45 Closing Ceremonies

Keynote Speakers

Education versus Learning: Changing Conceptions of Agency by Using the Future Differently
Mr Riel Miller, Head of Foresight at UNESCO, Paris
Riel Miller’s primary expertise is in designing processes that use the imaginary future to understand the present. For three decades his work has concentrated on how to assess and direct the potential for socio-economic transformation in the private and public sectors. He has championed the development of the Discipline of Anticipation as a way to advance the capacity to use the future. Riel is widely published on topics ranging from the future of the financial sector and the internet to the future of schooling and social equity. He teaches around the world and for six years was a faculty member of the Masters in Public Affairs, Institute de Sciences Politique (Sciences-Po), Paris, France. Riel is a former board member of both the Association of Professional Futurists and the World Futures Studies Federation. He serves on numerous editorial boards and gives keynote speeches around the world.

 

 

 

 

Future Schooling: Bringing together the key elements for whole school transformation
Mr Stephen Harris, Executive Director/Founder, Sydney Centre for Innovation in Learning, AustraliaStephen Harris, Principal of Northern Beaches Christian School (NBCS) has been in school-based education for more than 30 years. He founded the Sydney Centre for Innovation in Learning in 2005 and seeks to embed innovation and design-thinking into everyday school practice.
Stephen’s vision is that schools embrace a new paradigm where learning is personalised and collaborative, technology is adaptive, spaces are radically different to the traditional mindset, and a community built on positive relationships is at the core. Teaching and learning culture must be informed by global trends towards change in routines, expectations, perceptions, technology, organisation structures and leadership.

 

 

 

 

 

Democracy in and through Education: Ukrainian Challenges and Opportunities

Prof. Olena Pometun, doctor of science, Professor of Theory and Methology of teaching at the National Academy of Pedagogical Science of Ukraine (Kiev) and Creative Director of the NGO ‘Teachers for Democracy and Partnership’, Ukraine
Olena Pometun has specialized in curriculum and standard development, civic education, peace education, value-based education, lifelong learning and consumer education. In addition to many years of experience as a teacher and teacher trainer, Olena has written articles and textbooks for students and teacher training and has functioned as an international educational researcher and consultant. Since 2005 she has been involved in research on pedagogy aspects of Education for Sustainable development implemented into a Ukrainian secondary school curriculum. She has developed textbooks and manuals for school grades 1-9 based on in combination of empower pedagogy, active learning and critical thinking strategies. She is also a senior trainer and expert for several international institutions.
As creative director and supervisor of numerous educational projects of the NGO ‘Teachers for Democracy and Partnership’ Olena is promoting democracy and social partnership in education, innovative educational programs and materials for teachers and students in teaching and learning methods, technologies and training for educators.

 

 

Distinguished speaker at conference session

GAP Building: Learnings of the DESD
Prof. Charles Hopkins, UNESCO Chair, Canada
Charles Hopkins is currently the UNESCO Chair on Reorienting Teacher Education to Address Sustainability. Within this appointment he coordinates an international network of teacher education institutions from 55 countries collaboratively working upon the reorientation of elementary and secondary teacher education to address sustainable development. Charles is also a United Nations University (UNU) Chair on Education for Sustainable Development, developing Regional Centers of Expertise in (ESD) globally.
As a former Superintendent with the Toronto Board of Education and as a long time leader in the fields of education and ESD, Charles lectures and meets with education leaders and national decision makers around the world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zagreb Conference Them

Exploring Innovation, Learning and Sustainability

In order to meet the challenges for the future, education and training need to address the areas of innovation, learning and sustainability.

Development of today’s education and training is crucial to the ability to create innovative solutions and find new paths to enhanced learning and a better future.

Innovation and innovative are words we use to describe things, events, methods, and ideas that are new and useful.
Innovation is defined as “the process of making changes to something established by introducing something new.” It applies to “…radical or incremental changes to products, processes or services.” Over the years there have been many changes in the way education is designed and delivered in parts of the world.
Innovative approaches in teaching and learning aim to inspire, challenge and engage all young people in rich and rewarding learning experiences that will equip them with the essential skills and attitudes for life, learning and work in the 21st Century.

Learning is acquiring new, or modifying and reinforcing, existing knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, or preferences and may involve synthesizing different types of information. Learning is contextual. It does not happen all at once, but builds upon and is shaped by what we already know. To that end, learning may be viewed as a process, rather than a collection of factual and procedural knowledge.

Education for sustainable development (ESD) is not a particular programme or project, but is rather an umbrella for many forms of education that already exist, and new ones that remain to be created. ESD promotes efforts to rethink educational programmes and systems (both methods and contents) that currently support unsustainable societies. All educational programmes need to be based on five fundamental pillars of learning: Learning to know: Learning to do, Learning to live together; Learning to be; Learning to transform oneself and society.

The conference will contribute to the exploration of these perspectives.

Overview of conference sessions

40 presenters from 16 countries contributed with conference sessions, altogether ensuring that the conference will be an important venue for learning and international collaboration.

On the pages Friday Sessions and Saturday Sessions you find detailed descriptions of all the sessions.

List of parallel sessions

A1 Exploring the political dimension of ESD through innovative models of learning and participation
A2 Encouragement in the classroom
A3/1 Connecting traditional music to education for sustainable development: The case of a First Nations child diagnosed with autism
A3/2 Special needs in a foreign language classroom
A4/1 The Essence of Visualization and the Theatre of Movement
A4/2 Outdoor Learning
B1 GAP Building: Learnings of the DESD
B2 Learning – in school, at home or outdoors?
B3 Empathy and Human Rights. A stimulus for innovative teacher education?
C1 Self-advocacy
C2 Global Education – Action Competence in the Classroom
C3 Curriculum Renewal in Basic Education and Teacher Training in Finland
C4/1 The Need for a Global Teacher
C4/2 Report of seven years’ experience in the NHL sustainability minor
W1 The Manifesto: The link between honours education and ESD
W2 Neurodrama in Education – teaching with the brain in mind
W3/1 Sustainable Development Certification and Criteria in Finland
W3/2 Singing Moves Seniors – Music Activities and Wellbeing among Senior Citizens
D1/1 ICT integration in education in Rural Nepal: Opportunities and Challenges
D1/2 Virtual Reality
D2 Gifted children in school
D3 Spaceship Santa Maria to PromethEUs
D4 Socratic Seminars as an effective and exciting way to promote ownership for learning
E1 Educating for Tolerance in a Diverse Europe
E2/1 ‘Green Economy’ in School
E2/2 Lessons for Sustainable Development: How effective are they?
E3/1 Lead teacher – A Career Position for Teachers
E3/2 Education for Sustainability – implications for innovation and pedagogy

Friday Sessions

 

PARALLEL SESSIONS A FRIDAY 17 APRIL at 10.30 – 11.30

A1 Exploring the political dimension of ESD through innovative models of learning and participation
Presenter: Martin Fitzgerald, Limerick Institute of Technology, Tipperary, Ireland
Workshop. Target audience: Secondary and Upper Secondary School, Higher Education, Adult Education
The purpose of this session is to engage with interactive and innovative ways of exploring the political dimension of ESD with learners in the Adult/HE and upper secondary context. How do we get students to really engage with sustainability and its political challenges in a transformative and dynamic manner? This workshop will explore some of these methodologies and allow participants to reflect on these and discuss how they might be adapted in different learning environments.

A2 Encouragement in the classroom
Presenters: Theo Joosten and Willy Hoekstra, NWIP (Dutch association of Individual psychology), the Netherlands
Workshop. Target audience: Pre-school and Primary School
Teachers love to teach children. Sometimes teachers do not know what to do when children are seeking for attention or when they are misbehaving in the classroom. Adults are reacting on that misbehaviour and mostly are discouraging the children. How can encouragement help children, parents and teachers to become better learners in encouraging? What can we do in classrooms to make encouragement sustainable?
In this interactive workshop we will tell you all about encouraging children. We look forward to meeting you.

A3/1 Connecting traditional music to education for sustainable development: The case of a First Nations child diagnosed with autism
Presenter: Anne Lindblom, Karlstad University Sweden and University of Eastern Finland, Finland
Lecture/paper. 30 min. Target audience: General.
The aim of this paper is to examine music as an innovation in special education using a case study to illustrate how factors such as ethnicity and ability can become insurmountable obstacles for participation. The purpose of my presentation is to discuss and obtain other teacher’s and researcher’s views and comments on this ongoing PhD project. Using an ethnographic approach, interviews and observations were conducted to study the meaning of music for a six year old First Nations boy in BC Canada, diagnosed with autism. In light of his situation, sustainable development seems unperceivable.

A3/2 Special needs in a foreign language classroom
Presenter: Vita Kilar, University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Economics, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Lecture/paper. 30 min. Target audience: General; Higher education.
People with special needs in a foreign language classroom: German for Beginners at tertiary level.
The aim of the presentation is to outline the complexity of the problems that students with special needs – especially those with TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) and Dyslexia – and their teachers encounter in a foreign language classroom. Practical experience with the Course »Business German for Beginners« held at the Faculty of Economics of the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia is a starting point that might – based on the existing research findings – lead towards establishing a framework for a workable model.

A4/1 The Essence of Visualization and the Theatre of Movement
Presenter: Katarzyna Krason, Silesian University, Katowice, Poland
Lecture/paper. 30 min. Target audience: General, Youth.
The aim of this paper with film projection is to show a new authorship method of work with children – “the theatre of movement”. The goal of the theatre of movement based on kinetic visualization is self-expression of its participants as the presentation of their way of perception and manifestation of their body, emotions, and mind. Visualization, where the body becomes a tool for expressing one’s own thoughts, experiences becomes a medium of creation allowing a considerable progress in the development of children’s divergence, their contacts with other people, expansiveness and space appropriation.

A4/2 Outdoor Learning
Presenters: Aida Zorc and Renata Filipič, OŠ Valentina Vodnika, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Lecture/paper. 30 min. Target audience: Pre-school and Primary School.
This presentation will explore outdoor learning as a link or convergence between educating for sustainable development and an inquiry based science education.
We understand the term sustainable development as a development that enables a healthy environment and well-being to all the living beings on the planet. Outdoor learning, a project I have applied as an innovation project on ZRSŠ, enables children, which attend primary school, with more outdoor activities and therefore less sedentary learning style and a healthier environment. The data shows that only 20 per cent of our youngsters are physically active all through the week, the fact that highly influences their poor health and is consequently responsible for bad memorizing and learning skills. An outdoor classroom gives us the ability to use a wide variety of research methods from asking different inquiry questions (How does the ozone at the ground influence the undergrowth in a near-by forest?), measuring and presentation of results, observation and analyses of the results as well as speculation based upon those results. Furthermore, it enables us with a deeper critical contemplation and manifestation of the field conclusions. As a result, pupils are active and satisfied participants as well as creators and will as such highly influence others in the future.

PARALLEL SESSIONS B
FRIDAY 17 APRIL at 11.45 – 12.45

B1 GAP Building: Learnings of the DESD
Presenter: Prof. Charles Hopkins, UNESCO Chair on Reorienting Teacher Education to Address Sustainability, Canada
Lecture. Target audience: General.
This workshop is designed to explore how we can build on our ESD Decade experience to maintain the momentum that has been created. In a largely discussion and sharing session we will explore the role of our existing LTN (Learning Teacher Network) ESD pioneers and innovators as we aim for the Global Action Programme goals of scaling up and moving from the periphery of formal education to being considered as a vital component of a quality education. This workshop will explore the various role of the LTN in the GAP.

B2 Learning – in school, at home or outdoors?
Presenter: Martina Lundström, Department of Education, City of Linköping, Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: Pre-school and Primary School.
Traditionally, learning has been a part of teaching in the classroom, but Internet has changed all that. Our pupils learn 24 hours a day. This is a reality teachers are facing when they meet students today. Many teachers use flipped classrooms to enhance pupil’s learning. It is a challenge for some of us. How can we provide excellent quality in our flipped education? It is a technical issue as well as a methodological challenge. This interactive workshop will explore this topic. I will give examples from Swedish schools and provide the audience with tools for teaching in a modern classroom.

B3 Empathy and Human Rights. A stimulus for innovative teacher education?
Presenter: Dr Susanne Müller-Using, University of Osnabrück, Germany
Lecture. Target audience: General.
Empathy and human rights are both concepts that represent fundamental social values and rights in societies. They play a vital role in social interaction and communication. Recent studies on the current state of human rights education within public educational institutions have shown that empathy as well as human rights education are not sufficiently integrated into school programs nor into teacher training programs. This lecture will focus on possibilities of its explicit integration into the curricular programs of teacher training and will ask questions about the possible contribution of empathy and human rights education to innovation and development in learning.

PARALLEL SESSIONS C
FRIDAY 17 APRIL at 14.00 – 15.00

C1 Self-advocacy
Presenters: Ann Morrison Clement Ph.D., Colorado USA, Janja Košir, University of Ljubjana, Slovenia, Karin Grom, student, and Katarina Grom, parent, Slovenia
Lecture. Target audience: General.
Teachers and parents are responsible for the education and development of children with special needs. As the child matures, one most important outcome of the learning process is to learn self advocacy skills and become an advocate for one self. Education for sustainable development must focus on the young adult as their own advocate. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate such learned self advocacy skills. Karin Grom is an 18 year old student with Down’s Syndrome. Karin will present what is Down’s Syndome , what her needs are, what goals she has for the future and what support she needs to achieve these goals. Her teachers and parents will provide information on how such self advocacy skills have been learned .

C2 Global Education – Action Competence in the Classroom
Presenters: Mathias Demetriades and Johanna Lund Rockliffe, the Global School/UHR Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: General; Secondary and Upper Secondary School.
The Global School and UNDP introduce their new web based teaching material on www.millenniemalen.nu which aims to give a more accurate and balanced image of the world. Key questions will be raised such as: Is the world getting better? What kind of world are we approaching? Are there two worlds on the same street? What pedagogy is required in order to create action competence in the classroom? And finally, how can the concept of global education/Education for sustainable development be embedded in everyday school work?

C3 Curriculum Renewal in Basic Education and Teacher Training in Finland
Presenters: Eija Liisa Sokka-Meaney M.Ed, Merja Kukkonen M.Ed. and Minna Haring Ph.D., University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland
Workshop. Target audience: General.
The aim of this presentation is to describe some recent changes in the Finnish education system and the renewal process of the curriculum. The rapid development of technology, globalization, multiculturalism and the need for sustainable development have made changes necessary. The development of the curriculum process also sets new challenges for teacher education. We focus on the realization of the curricular changes in teacher education and teaching practice. Participants in the workshop will be encouraged to ask questions about and comment on the developments described.

C4/1 The Need for a Global Teacher
Presenters: Daniela Polisenska, Rianne Schippers and Walter Fernandes, the Hague University of Applied Sciences, the Hague, the Netherlands
Lecture. 30 min. Target audience: Higher Education; Pre-school and Primary School.
The European Union states that every European citizen should speak at least two foreign languages since multilingualism enlarges the international awareness. It goes without saying that multilingualism brings challenges for the educators, as multilingual children need specific guidance. This calls for ‘a multicultural teacher’ with up-to-date knowledge of multilingualism and skills to effectively support the pupils in their school career. A great asset in multicultural classrooms is teachers with ethnically diverse backgrounds. Such teachers are often the role models in urban settings.
Just like the primary education, the higher education assumes that all students should perform according to the monolingual standard. Yet, most students with different ethnical backgrounds started learning the official language the moment they went to school and often did not receive a good quality language input in their first language. Consequently, this group of students has a higher risk of dropout due to various factors such as non-native proficiency in the official language, insufficient knowledge of the dominant culture and lower socio-economic status. Given the situation described above the claim is that good quality education in a multicultural setting needs (1) teachers with knowledge and positive attitude with respect to multicultural issues and (2) cultural and linguistic support for students from ethnically diverse backgrounds in order to minimize their dropout from primary teacher training.

C4/2 Report of seven years’ experience in the NHL sustainability minor
Presenter: Petra Esser, the NHL University of Applied Sciences, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands
Lecture/paper. 30 min. Target audience: Higher Education.
At NHL University of Applied Sciences there is now seven years of experience with a minor on global sustainability. The minor Global Sustainability (now minor Going Green) is consisting of a 6 weeks theory part and a 12 weeks project with students in multidisciplinary teams. An analysis of the development in this minor is presented, e.g. the sustainability competencies, project issues, assessments, and participating students.

PARALLEL SESSIONS W
FRIDAY 17 APRIL at 15.30 – 16.30

W1 The Manifesto: The link between honours education and ESD
Presenters: Margriet Kat, the NHL University of Applied Sciences, Leeuwarden, and Ron Weerheijm, Hogeschool Rotterdam, the Netherlands
Workshop. Target audience: Secondary/Upper secondary; Youth; Higher education.
The Dutch government has stimulated the development of Honours education in the Higher education during the last five years. At the end of the first pilot period, three aspects of Excellence have been defined: The first is related to the organisational context in which students are stimulated to get the best out of themselves. The second focuses on students with above-average talent and motivation who perform at an exceptionally high level.A third view stimulates highly motivated students to stray off the beaten track.
Students do not relate to the word excellence. Still, they both like to explore their disciplines in depth, as to seek additional challenges within a much broader social context, by working on assignments relevant to society. It is in this aspect that we see and like to explore with you the link between (Dutch) honours education and ESD.

W2 Neurodrama in education – teaching with the brain in mind
Presenter: Alicja Gałazka, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
Workshop. Target audience: General.
The brain receives its information through the senses. It is constantly changing (neuroplasticity) through experiencing and learning new things and is highly activated by stories. Brains are socially wired and can synchronise with each other (through mirror neurons).The brain learns first through imitation and mimicry and through imagined as well as real experiences. Emotionally charged experiences are more motivating and memorable. Drama has its roots in multi-sensory, dramatic, social play, which is spontaneous and prevalent before children come to school. Teachers may then add structure and offer forms and help scaffold imagined experiences for the children in drama lessons. They may use drama strategies to support this. In the practical workshop participants will learn how to use different drama strategies such as hot-seating, freeze frame, thought-tracking and conscience alley for making a brain friendly lesson and help student to understand their own minds. The brain learns first through imitation and mimicry and through imagined as well as real experiences.

W3/1 Sustainable Development Certification and Criteria for the first and secondary level, adult education and liberal adult education in Finland
Poster presentation. 30 min. Target audience: General and Adult education.
Presenter: Sini Louhivuori, Jyväskylä Adult Education Centre, and Muti Ikonen, Alkio College, Finland
In Finland, sustainable development is incorporated as a comprehensive, subject crossing theme in the national core curricula of general and vocational education. In 2009, the environmental criteria were updated to sustainable development criteria covering the environmental, economic, social and cultural aspects of sustainability. The criteria apply to the general and vocational education at the first and secondary level, adult education and liberal adult education. The new criteria and related self-evaluation tools are based on the principle of quality circle (plan, do, check, act), and are applicable with quality systems. They provide a systematic tool for the planning of teaching and constructing of a sustainable development program.
The KESO-project offers further education for staff in Finnish non-formal adult education institutes in Central Finland in 2010-2016. It is funded by the Ministry of Culture and Education. At the moment the project consists of 20 non-formal adult education organisations in Central Finland. For the years 2014-2016 one of the project´s main goals is for at least 50 % of the organisations to be awarded the Sustainable Development Certificate. We develop sustainability, use of social media and pedagogy for special needs students. We want to enhance the knowledge and skills of the whole personnel and to promote the well-being of everyone, senior part-time teachers in particular. The supporting of working communities across generations and work tasks is also a key action in our KESO project.

W3/2 Singing Moves Seniors – Music Activities and Wellbeing among Senior Citizens
Poster presentation. 30 min. Target audience: General and Adult education.
Presenter: Sini Louhivuori, Jyväskylä Adult Education Centre, and Muti Ikonen, Alkio College, Finland
This presentation will describe the results of a project called “Singing moves seniors” (SMS). The SMS Project aimed at promoting and maintaining the physical and psycho-social wellbeing of senior citizens by using the tools and methods of singing and moving. The project used activities and models of culture and arts to maintain the abilities to cope with the tasks of everyday life. The first project phase was executed at the Adult Education Centre of the Jyväskylä Region in 2005-2006, and the second phase is a part of the Senior Citizenship Project administrated by the Alkio College, Korpilahti during 2007-2008. The target groups were senior citizens and the staffs of the old people’s homes, Colleges and Adult Education Centres in the Jyväskylä Region and Central Finland. The research is based on the results of several Finnish and international studies on social capital and wellbeing, which emphasize the connections between cultural activities and the life expectancy of people.
The feedback and analysed results seem to support the idea that gymnastics, music and music education is an important part of life-long learning. Music education should have a more important role in senior citizens life than what it has now. The results support the hypothesis of the important role of gymnastics, music and music education as an important part of wellbeing and health in senior citizens lives.

Conference Sessions Saturday 18 April

 

PARALLEL SESSIONS D SATURDAY 18 APRIL at 10.30 – 11.30

D1/1 ICT integration in education in Rural Nepal: Opportunities and Challenges
Presenter: Uma Sigdel, Kathmandu University, School of Education, Kathmandu, Nepal
Lecture/Paper. 30 min. Target audience: Secondary and Upper secondary School; Higher Education; Youth.
Nepal is running following the educational system that was shaped decades back. The need of innovation on primitive teaching learning processes is imperative. ICT is a very effective means for educational transformation. This fact has now been realized and some policies have been identified and some are in process to be carried out in Nepal (including Master Plan 2013-2017). In Rural Nepal, even setting a single computer is still a luxury, whilst the constraints related to policy, finance, teachers, curricula are alive nationally. (The paper attempts to share the status, policies, challenges and the possibilities of ICT integration in Rural Nepal)

D1/2 Virtual Reality
Presenter: Deepa Sekhri, St Patrick’s School, Ministry of Education, Singapore
Round table. 30 min. Target audience: Secondary and Upper secondary School.
Virtual Reality can be used in classrooms today to provide insights into current world situations and to raise awareness of different cultures. It serves as a catalyst for discovery and acquisition of different cultural values, beliefs and behaviour, at the same time increasing both individual and group participation in learning activities. This pedagogy also creates opportunities for teachers to become creative as material designers and being more sensitive to the needs of their students. Closer to home, the Malaysia Airlines crashes in 2014 created just an opening for a 2-month ESL unit using realia.

D2 Gifted children in school
Presenter: Elisabet Mellroth, Älvkullegymnasiet, Karlstad, Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: General.
In Sweden, gifted education is a relatively new and sometimes unknown topic in schools. In spring 2015, the National Agency for Education plans to release support material about how to support gifted children in schools. This is the first time in Sweden that gifted children and their needs are mentioned in governmental documents regarding education. To engage teachers and to help them scientifically evaluate their work, a process called “research circles” is sometimes used. In this process a teacher educated in research, for example a PhD, leads other teachers to investigate their own practice. This session presents the process of a “research circle” where 7 teachers for students in grade 4 to 9 investigate how to challenge students gifted in mathematics.

D3 Spaceship Santa Maria to PromethEUs
Presenters: Elvin Smajic, Christian Rydberg and Stefan Nilsson at Kungsgårdsskolan, Ängelholm, Sweden and Anita Lasić, Osnovna škola don Mihovila Pavlinovića, Podgora, Croatia
Workshop. Target audience: General.
During the work shop experiences from two EU-funded school partnerships for students aged 12-16 years will be presented. The Santa Maria Spaceship-partnership (2010- 2013) consisted of three schools in Croatia, Poland and Sweden and in the autumn 2014 joined the Swedish and Croatian partners three new partners in an Erasmus+ school partnership named Life on PromethEUs. The projects are both about developing, testing and implementing an innovative approach of learning focusing on cross-curriculum teaching that is inquiry based focusing on sustainability issues.

D4 Socratic Seminars as an effective and exciting way to promote ownership for learning
Presenter: Barbara Bialek, SPLOT Middle and High Civic School im. Jana Karskiego, Nowy Sacz, Poland
Workshop. Target audience: General.
Socratic seminars are student-centred classroom discussions that promote higher level thinking, more careful reading of texts, and increased classroom and civil discussion skills. This workshop provides basic seminar training so that participants can return to their own classrooms and begin to conduct seminars. A Socratic seminar workshop is, by its very nature, highly participatory and interactive. By participating in an actual seminar, participants are able to experience what their students might experience and learn the process “by doing.” Indeed, the “hands and minds on” aspect of a Socratic seminar workshop is extremely powerful. The presenter works as Regional Coordinator of Socratic Seminar Implementation in Poland.

PARALLEL SESSIONS E
SATURDAY 18 APRIL at 14.00 – 15.00

E1 Educating for Tolerance in a Diverse Europe
Presenters: Mathias Demetriades, the Global School/UHR Sweden and Lovisa Fhager Havdelin, Teskedsorden (the Order of the Teaspoon) Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: General.
Europe faces great challenges concerning xenophobia and intolerance. How can we as educators come across in the classroom without risking to increase differences and intolerant behaviour between students. Is there a sustainable way to do this? This workshop aims at exploring the concept of intolerance and tolerance. The Global School and The Order of the Teaspoon work mostly with teachers, politicians, and decision makers. The participants will be given examples of existing methods in Sweden that results in increased tolerance and reduces racism and intolerant attitudes among young people. You will also be exposed to active learning methods for the classroom.

E2/1 ‘Green Economy’ in School
Presenter: Loretta Tofanicchio, IIS F.ORIOLI, Montefiascone, Italy
Lecture. 30 min. Target audience: Secondary and Upper secondary School.
This presentation will describe a ’green’ classroom project. We focus on ’Green economy’, which results in reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities. Green economy is an economic development model based on subsstainable development and the knowledge of ecological economics. The objectives of the green economy are: a) use of renewable energy instead of fossil energy; b) increased efficiency in the use of energy resources; c) reducing emissions of carbon dioxide and pollutants in the environment; d) reducing the production of waste and the environmental impact to human activities, and e) preservation of the biodiversity and different ecosystem. With recycling we can convert almost all materials in new objects. If we don’t use renewable energies and recycle we contribute to the increase of global warming.

E2/2 Lessons for Sustainable Development: How effective are they?
Presenter: Olena Pometun, Teachers for Democracy and Partnership NGO, Ukraine
Lecture. 30 min. Target audience: General.
There are many arguments for and against including sustainable development as a separate subject in schools. The experience leads us to conclude that introducing ‘Lessons for Sustainable Development’ as a separate school or extra-curricular subject was the best initial strategy in Ukraine. The reason was its effective outreach: it gave us an opportunity to reach out beyond the schools to the parents, families and friends of pupils, engaging them in practical sustainable actions.
After several years of developing curriculum and delivering lessons to nearly 200,000 pupils in Ukraine, we set up a research program to assess the effectiveness of the lessons. The researchers have interviewed and collected questionnaires from 1,000 people:
– Pupils, teachers, parents, school administrators
– Who have experience of one or more years of lessons for sustainable development
– With whole-school or single-class approach
– And control groups with no such experience
A major purpose of the research is to ascertain to what extent pupils’ behaviour has been influenced by the lessons, i.e. how they have translated into action. The data were analysed by expert group. We propose using the findings to explore questions related to criteria for assessing effectiveness, to separate ESD subject versus trans-subjects (trans-disciplinary) way, and to a whole-school approach versus teaching ESD single classes.

E3/1 Lead teacher – A Career Position for Teachers
Presenter: Susanne Mellerskog, Nobelgymnasiet (Nobel Upper Secondary school), Karlstad, Sweden
Lecture. 30 min. Target audience: General.
This session invites participants to a presentation on the new model for career positions for teachers in Sweden. The so-called Lead Teachers shall help increase the reaching of school targets and be role models within school. The session will invite to a discussion if there are similar systems in other countries. The workshop will be led by a lead teacher who has held this position for one year.

E3/2 Education for Sustainability – implications for innovation and pedagogy
Presenter: Bill Goddard, (formerly) the University of Greenwich, England UK
Lecture. 30 min. Target audience: General.
The intention of this lecture is to flesh out the overarching issues of Sustainability and to work towards potential solutions with education and learning in terms of innovation and pedagogy. The session will identify key global expressions of need in terms of sustainability before beginning to work on the possibilities for the incorporation of sustainability concepts within curriculum materials and pedagogic approaches. Participants will bring with them specific contexts within which they work and potential outcomes will address a range of potential strategies for future development.

Zagreb Conference Documentation

 

The session abstracts and the name of presenters are published in the folder ‘Conference Sessions’ on this site.

Full conference documentation is published on this page. Selected photos from the conference are published on The Learning Teacher Network on facebook and can be viewed in public also without having a facebook account.

Keynote speakers

Riel Miller, UNESCO: “Education versus Learning: Changing Conceptions of Agency by Using the Future Differently” (pdf)
Stephen Harris: “Future Schooling: Bringing together the key elements for whole school transformation”, Part 1 (pdf)
Stephen Harris: “Future Schooling: Bringing together the key elements for whole school transformation”, Part 2 (pdf)
Project Barcelona 3D Fly Through (video)
SCIL on TEN Eyewitness News (video)
Prof. Olena Pometun: “Democracy in and through education: Ukrainian Challenges and Opportunities” (pdf)

Distinguished speaker at conference session

B1 Prof. Charles Hopkins: “GAP Building: Learnings of the DESD” (pdf)

Conference presentations

Opening session – Magnus Persson: Key Partner to UNESCO (pdf) 
A1 Exploring the political dimension of ESD through innovative models of learning and participation (pdf)
Giant Steps Activity (pdf)
Story (pdf) 
Reflection Sheet (pdf) 
A2 Encouragement in the classroom (pdf) 
A3/1 Connecting traditional music to education for sustainable development: The case of a First Nations child diagnosed with autism. Presentation (pdf) 
A3/1 Connecting traditional music to education for sustainable development: The case of a First Nations child diagnosed with autism. Paper (pdf)
A3/2 Special needs in a foreign language classroom (pdf) 
A4 Outdoor Learning, Presentation1 (pdf) Presentation2 (pdf) 
B1 GAP Building: Learnings of the DESD (see above) 
B2 Learning – in school, at home or outdoors? (pdf) 
B3 Empathy and Human Rights. A stimulus for innovative teacher education? (pdf) 
C1 Self-advocacy 
C2 Global Education – Action Competence in the Classroom (pdf) 
C3 Curriculum Renewal in Basic Education and Teacher Training in Finland (pdf) 

C4/1 The Need for a Global Teacher (link) 

C4/2 Report of seven years’ experience in the NHL sustainability minor (pdf) 
W1 The Manifesto: The link between honours education and ESD (pdf) 
W2 Neurodrama in Education – teaching with the brain in mind 
W3/1 Sustainable Development Certification and Criteria in Finland, Poster (pdf) 
Paper (pdf) 
W3/2 Singing Moves Seniors – Music Activities and Wellbeing among Senior Citizens, Poster 1 (pdf) 
Poster 2 (pdf)
Poster 3 (pdf) 
D1/1 ICT integration in education in Rural Nepal: Opportunities and Challenges (pptx) 
D1/2 Virtual Reality 
D2 Gifted children in school (pdf) 
D3 Spaceship Santa Maria to PromethEUs (pdf) 
D4 Socratic Seminars as an effective and exciting way to promote ownership for learning (hand-on workshop, no materials used) 
E1 Educating for Tolerance in a Diverse Europe (pdf) 
E2/1 ‘Green Economy’ in School Presentation1 (pdf)
Presentation2 (pdf)
Paper (pdf) Presentation 3 (pdf)
Project (pdf) 
E2/2 Lessons for Sustainable Development: How effective are they?(pdf) 
E3/1 Lead teacher – A Career Position for Teachers (pdf) 

Some feedback from the Zagreb Conference

Below are some quotes of feedback from conference participants.

’Thanks for another great learning experience.’
University colleague, England UK

’Again, it was a very good conference in all respects – congratulations!’
Teacher, Portugal

‘It has been very inspiring and interesting and I hope to attend more of these conferences in the future.’
University researcher, Sweden

‘Thank you very much for a very interesting and inspiring conference in Zagreb and congratulations to the conference team for the perfect organisation and very good programme.’
Head of Department, Germany

‘A delightful learning experience and a precious opportunity for networking and sharing, and of course spending time together, endless laughs, and most importantly seeing so many educators passionate about what they do on an every-day basis. I would definitely want to return to this inviting and friendly environment which you were able to create. Well done!’
University lecturer, Poland

’Thank you so much for everything. I had such an amazing time, learning and meeting friends from all around Europe and beyond.’
Teacher student, Nepal

‘I am still of the impression this exceptional event in your organization.’ (written 10 days after the conference)
Teacher, Slovenia

’I am very uplifted by the conference content and I got new contacts’
University researcher, Sweden

‘I really enjoyed the conference! At home, my colleagues and school managers were very curious about what I’ve learned, so I will be giving a presentation spreading the ideas of the conference.’
University teacher, Belgium

‘Thank you for yet another successful conference.‘
Trainer, Sweden

It was a great conference and fruitful outcomes for everybody.
University professor, Ukraine

‘Thank you over and over again’
Teacher, Denmark

‘Thank you for an inspirational conference!’
Teacher, England UK

‘An inspiring conference!’
International Relations Coordinator, Sweden

‘I warmly thank and congratulate you for organizing a very satisfactory event’
University teacher, Finland

‘Many thanks for a warm welcome and a great conference. I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was most stimulating and I found plenty of useful nuggets to help me in my work.’
Head teacher, Ireland

‘Thanks for a wonderful and very interesting conference.’
Development Manager, Sweden