The 9th International Conference: “Education for Sustainable Development”

 

The Learning Teacher Network’s 9th International Conference was held at the modern, four star Hotel Tivoli Oriente in Lisbon, Portugal on September 26-28, 2013. The title of the conference was “Education for Sustainable Development”.

Education for sustainable development (ESD) is a matter of rapidly growing importance, concern and recognition on international, European, national and local levels. In all countries and cultures, education and training is the key in order to describe, re-orient for and build knowledge, understanding and action for a sustainable future.

Education for Sustainable Development allows every human being to acquire the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values necessary to shape a sustainable future. ESD means including key sustainable development issues into teaching and learning. The conference wtherefore portrayed a range of pedagogical angles and elements to such sustainable teaching and learning. Within the topic of the conference, thematically the programme addressed ecological, social and economic perspectives on ESD.

The conference topic was introduced by internationally recognized experts in this focal area of the conference, followed by parallel sessions of lectures and workshops led by practitioners and researchers. With deep appreciation of the many colleagues who presented and shared their knowledge and experience, the conference programme included 42 quality sessions given by more than 70 presenters from 16 countries in Europe and beyond.

Alike the previous conferences, we were welcoming colleagues from all levels of education and training in Europe and beyond to a golden opportunity for gaining new knowledge and sharing experience in a good and friendly atmosphere in an international setting.

“Education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world.”
Nelson Mandela

Conference Venue

 

The 9th International Conference will be held at the four star Hotel Tivoli Oriente in Lisbon, Portugal on September 26-28, 2013.

With a stunning view out over the Tagus/Tejo river and Parque das Nações (former Expo site), this 4-star Lisbon hotel reflects the energy, technology, art and friendliness of Lisbon today. Take time out to enjoy the magnificent features of the hotel, including the indoor swimming pool.

Link to the Hotel Tivoli Oriente, Lisbon

The Tivoli Oriente can be easily reached from any part of the city. From the Lisbon airport it only takes 5 minutes (2 subway stations) to go to the Tivoli Oriente; a very cheap and easy ride. The name of the station is Oriente.

Lisbon Conference Programme

 

Thursday September 26th 2013
16h30-17h45 Registration of delegates
18h00 Cultural Performance followed by the Opening Session with Words of Welcome by Honoured guests
– Dr. João Casanova de Almeida, State Secretary at the Ministry of Education and Science
– Dr. Carlos Nogueira, the European Commission Representation in Portugal
– Dr. Paulo Agostinho, Director de Departamento de Educação
– Director Maria do Céu Crespo, the Portuguese National EU Agency, Agencia Nacional do Programma “Aprendizagem ao Longo da Vida”
18h45 Plenary: Opening of the Conference with keynotes by
– Ms Soo-Hyang Choi, Director of the Division of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development at UNESCO
– Mr Magnus Persson, President of the Learning Teacher Network
20h00 Conference Welcome Dinner at the Orizon Restaurant

Friday September 27th 2013
09h00 Plenary: Keynote speech by Prof. Akpezi Ogbuigwe, former Head of environmental education and training at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
10h00 Coffee break
10h30 Parallel Sessions A
11h45 Parallel Sessions B
12h45 Lunch
14h00 Parallel Sessions C
15h15 D Plenary: Keynote speech by Dave DeLuca, DoSomething.org, USA
16h00 Coffee, free time and networking
20h00 Conference Banquet Dinner at the Myriad Restaurant

Saturday September 28th 2013
09h00 Plenary: Keynote speech by Prof. Tom Tiller, University of Tromsø, Norway
10h00 Coffee break
10h30 Parallel Sessions E
11h45 Parallel Sessions F
12h45 Lunch
14h00 Parallel Sessions G
15h00 Coffee break
15h30 Parallel Sessions H
16h30 Plenary: Prof. Charles Hopkins, UNESCO Chair on Reorienting Teacher Education to Address Sustainability and United Nations University (UNU) Chair on Education for Sustainable Development, York University in Toronto, Canada
16h45 Cultural Programme and Closing Ceremonies

Keynote Speakers

 
ESD Beyond 2014
Ms Soo-Hyang Choi, Director of the Division of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development at UNESCOMs Soo-Hyang Choi will thematically open the Lisbon Conference with a keynote at the opening session, revealing and portraying the coming international strategy for the work on Education for Sustainable Development after the end of the current United Nation’s Decade for ESD, which ends in 2014.

Ms Soo-Hyang Choi, a national of the Republic of Korea, holds a Master’s degree in Education (1985) and a PhD in Educational Psychology (1990) from the University of Alberta in Edmonton (Canada).

Before she joined UNESCO, she worked in the Korean Educational Development Institute in Korea as a researcher in early childhood and a team leader for international affairs (1993-1997). Ms. Choi entered the UNESCO Secretariat in 1997, as senior programme specialist seconded from Korea. In 1998, she was appointed to the post of Chief of the Early Childhood and Family Education Section and afterwards, held various chief positions at Hqs, dealing with inclusive education, field support and coordination, technical, vocational and secondary education. In 2007, she took a special assignment to the UNESCO Office in Islamabad, assisting the Office’s participation in the UN reform. In 2008 she became the Director of the UNESCO Cluster Office in Harare, Zimbabwe, covering Botswana, Malawi, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, while also representing UNESCO to the Southern African Development Community (SADC). Returning to UNESCO Hqs in 2010, she worked as Deputy Director of the Bureau of Field Coordination until she was appointed to the Director post in the Division of Education for Peace and Sustainable development in April 2012.

 

Welcoming ESD into Mainstream Education

Prof. Charles Hopkins, York University, Toronto, Canada

To date, ESD has often been misunderstood and viewed by education leaders as a collection of unfunded societal issues to be jammed into an already crowded curriculum. Fortunately, school leaders are slowly recognizing that schooling is not solely about PISA scores but also about preparation for the world they will inherit. Mathematics, language arts and other core subjects are indeed important. However, they are tools and skills. They are not the purpose of education.

Slowly we are discovering that ESD is not an enemy to PISA scores but is rather a contributor to a new view of quality education. There is a view of a possible synergy emerging, that ESD can contribute to the acquisition of the traditional disciplines through enhanced intellectual engagement while preparing for a life that is oriented to personal and societal well-being.

Charles Hopkins is currently the UNESCO Chair at York University in Toronto, Canada where he coordinates an international network of teacher education institutions from 55 countries collaboratively working upon the reorientation of elementary and secondary teacher education to address sustainable development. He is also a United Nations University (UNU) Chair on Education for Sustainable Development, developing Regional Centers of Expertise in (ESD) globally.

Charles Hopkins, as a former Superintendent with the Toronto Board of Education and as a long time leader in the fields of education and ESD, lectures and meets with education leaders around the world. As one of many distinguished leadership assignments, he chaired the drafting committee for the Bonn Declaration at the UNESCO World Conference on Education for Sustainable Development in 2009, which was midway for moving into the second half of the UN Decade.

 

Education for Sustainable Development: The Heart of The Matter

Prof. Akpezi Ogbuigwe, former Head of environmental education and training at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

There is a doctrine in Law known as ‘Lifting the Veil of Incorporation’. When a Judge wants to get to the real identity behind a corporate personality so as to evidently be seen to do justice, he lifts the veil of incorporation and gets to the real identity of the personalities behind the corporation.
I will be borrowing from that concept to unravel ESD through an excursion into its history and metamorphosis so that hopefully we can together discover the ‘heart of the matter’.

Up until June 2010 before taking a two year leave of absence for research, Akpezi Ogbuigwe was the Head of the Environmental Education and Training Programme in UNEP where she amongst others things coordinated UNEP’s multi-stakeholders programme on Mainstreaming Environment and Sustainability in African Universities (MESA) and the student movement on Sustainability Generation. She was also UNEP’s lead focal point for the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development; a trainer and facilitator at most UNEP’s training programmes and international fora; focal point for UNEP in the UNESCO-UNIVOC International Consultation on Education for Sustainable Development: Engaging the Corporate Sector; UNEP’s focal point, trainer and facilitator for the UNEP/University of Joensuu Course on International Environmental Law Making and Diplomacy and lead writer of the UNEP Environmental Education and Training Implementation Strategy for 2008 – 2011. She has vast experience in the field of environmental education, research and training.

Prior to joining UNEP in 2002, she was a Professor of Law, a Reader and Dean at the Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Portharcourt, Nigeria and volunteered her time at ANPEZ Centre for Environment and Development, Portharcourt, Nigeria where she worked with schools, communities, government and the private sector on issues of environment and development and the running of an environmental library.

 

 

… Just 10 seconds extra …

Prof. Tom Tiller, University of Tromsø, Norway
Appreciative leadership and learning has been discovered to be the missing link in organisational development. Applying the significance of appreciation in daily management has been proven to radically increase success in academic performance, work satisfaction and other areas.
Professor Tom Tiller will describe and present experiences and results from action research projects in schools and working life in Scandinavia as well as highlight methods and strategies for enhancing the appreciative dimension.

Since 1987 Tom Tiller holds the position as professor of education at the University of Tromsø in Norway and currently also the assignment as research leader at the Nordic Centre for Action Research and Action Learning there. Over the years Tom Tiller has been leading larger research projects in both Norway and Sweden. Among these can be mentioned being leader of research/evaluation work on commission from the former Ministry of Social Services/ The Research Council of Norway; Research leader for a national project in school evaluation; Leader of an evaluation project initiated by the former Ministry of Education with the goal of studying processes and the results of the Ministry’s focus on school-based evaluation. In addition to leading action research and other projects in several Swedish municipalities on leader or school development, he was the research leader for a group of 15 Swedish researchers in the “Team work in Swedish schools” project, initiated by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions and involving six Swedish municipalities, which involved a radical change in school organization from one teacher and one classroom to project- and group-oriented learning.

As researcher, Tom Tiller has published more than 200 published works, including 59 books (including edited and co-authored books) published by Norwegian, Nordic, and international publishing houses. He is member of Editorial Boards for international journals such as Reflective Practice/International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives/ and Professional Development in Education (both Routledge).

 

 Youth for Social Change

David DeLuca, Head of Campaigns, DoSomething.org, USA

Non-profits, educators, and social change activists are always talking about creating movements. But with youth and social change, the movement is already here. This generation of teens are committed to making a difference. For an organization to capture that energy, it must deliver opportunities where young people are and in the ways young people find relevant.
This talk will explore DoSomething.org’s philosophy of engaging teens. From personalization, to mobile communications, to best motivational practices, it explores how and why over a million teens take action through DoSomething.org every year, and how those insights can be adapted to the educational field.

David J DeLuca is the Head of Campaigns at DoSomething.org. There, he manages a team of campaign specialists that execute over 20 campaigns a year, each designed to get teens to take action on a specific cause. He is responsible for understanding how teens take action, and creating a process that executes those insights effectively. In the past year, he has pushed his team to create volunteer experiences on a variety of platforms – from SMS to Facebook to mobile web – activating over 800,000 teens. Campaigns include The Pregnancy Text, an innovative text-messaging experience where teens challenged their friends raised a sassy phone baby (lots of poop jokes), an anti-texting and driving campaign where young people used a fun pair of “thumb socks” to give a serious message to their friends, and a teen-led census of bullying in American schools. Before DoSomething.org, he worked as a writer-producer at Nickelodeon’s in-house advertising department, receiving Addy and Promax Awards for his work. He has also run a successful worker-action for health care rights, and has consulted for multiple progressive New York City organizations. He is a recent graduate of Columbia University’s Masters in Strategic Communication program. Also, he makes great homemade pasta.

 

Overview of conference sessions

 

Close to 80 presenters from 16 countries will contribute with more than 40 conference sessions, altogether ensuring that the conference will be an important venue for learning and international collaboration.

On the pages Friday Sessions and Saturday Sessions you find detailed descriptions of all the sessions.

List of parallel sessions

A1 A green thread/pathway from pre-school to upper secondary school
A2 Embedding sustainable education in regional transition movements
A3 Evaluating Sustainable Development educational strategies to make progress
A4 Social Constructivism in Practice
A5 Intention of Portuguese and Luxemburgish pupils to adopt environmentally sustainable behaviours
A6 Preservice teachers’ perceptions and attitudes toward parental discipline: When discipline becomes abuse
B1 Primary school teacher translation of UNECE competences
B2 Find YOUR learning path
B3 Sustainable development of teachers’ competencies
B4 iPad as a tool for students with SEN (Special Educational Needs
B5 Portfolio of Integration
B6 Prevention of reading comprehension problems starts in the classroom
C1 The Global Classroom – Educating for tolerance
C2 ESD and Citizenship; Is Democracy up to the challenge?
C3 How to become a climate school
C4/1 The role of deliberate practice in the development of abilities of the gifted students – theoretical background and the research results
C4/2 Slovene and Portuguese pre-school teachers about play and movement of pre-school children
C5 Meeting the Education Needs of New Arrival Children
C6 Educating and enhancing sustainable development of children with mathematical learning disabilities
E1/1 Learning for Sustainability in Scotland
E1/2 Prise – Analysis of sustainability in Dutch Primary Education
E2 Sustainable Development through the concept of IE
E3 Water Management in France and Morocco
E4 The School of the Future
E5 Literacy by Design
E6 Training teachers for the classroom of tomorrow
F1 Finnish teaching practice and the influence of the new curriculum on the future of teaching
F2 Education for Sustainable Development and Addressing Diversity
F3 ESD with Storyline
F4 What do Starting Teachers Need?
F5 Sustainable school development under systemic view – A task of school management
F6 Digital Participation for eco-responsive consumption: Facebook as a 2.0 education tool
G1 The importance of education for sustainability in Portugal
G2 Don’t follow the road, find your own path!
G3 You are what you read
G4 Entrepreneurship in the school curriculum
G5 Ship Sail: Jackmandora, mi nuh choose none! An autoethnographic investigation into the effects a migrant’s personal experiences have on the teaching and learning process
G6 Emotional aspects of school education- curricula and relationship context
H1 The Sustainable Construction Company
H2 Spectrum of Inspiration – Unleashing potential
H3 Grow your own knowledge: research skills for sustainable school development
H4 “Building Learning Power” – Stretching your learning muscles for the 21st century
H5 A web-based educational computer assistant software application for clock reading
H6 Creative Mathematic activities

Friday 27 September 2013

 

PARALLEL SESSIONS A
FRIDAY 27 SEPTEMBER at 10.30 – 11.30

A1 A green thread/pathway from pre-school to upper secondary school
Presenters: Ann-Sofi Johansson and Mathias Sundin, Linköping Municipality Education Department, Linköping, Sweden
Lecture. Target audience: General, Pre-school, Primary school and Secondary School
In Linköping municipality, teachers from pre-school up to secondary school have made plans for how all children should be taught in energy-, resource- and environmental issues. The plans are based on curricula, education research, entrepreneurship and interaction with the business community. Sundsvall municipality works successfully with sustainable projects in upper secondary school along with the business community. Both municipalities cooperate in KNUT, a school development project for a holistic approach to sustainable development. The aim is to increase students’ interest and commitment to global environmental and climate issues and to attract them for higher education in science and technology. The project is mentored by Linköping University.

A2 Embedding sustainable education in regional transition movements
Presenter: BSc MBA Peter Bootsma, Katholieke Onderwijs Centrale, Groningen, the Netherlands
Workshop. Target audience: General
Sustainable development comes down to changing the complex adaptive system of economy and society from within. It requires all societal sectors to work in synergy and sync, to nudge the system stepwise into more sustainable equilibria. That’s a new type of collaboration, needing new concepts and practices. Regions are ideal laboratories fo this, and education can be central in developing, applying and sharing. This paper presents five open source concepts enabling schools to connect to the larger transition movement, to actively contribute to synergy and synchronisation, and to provide pupils, students and society with practical concepts for expanding the movement.

A3 Evaluating Sustainable Development educational strategies to make progress
Presenters: Christian Peltier and Léna Leducq, Agricultural Ministry – Research and Teaching Services, Rouillon, France
Lecture. Target audience: General and Adult education
Agricultural schools in France have promoted sustainable educational strategies. Since 1995 125 agricultural schools (15%) have initiated a sustainable program and most in Agenda 21. Sustainable programs and actions with pupils (secondary and upper secondary) have brought a new demand for “Evaluation” processes and tools. To understand the progress margin in the sustainable education strategies in school or how to assess theses progress in social, environmental and economic matters is important. It gives more accessible information on the realised actions, about employed methods and new targets to reach, for the whole educational community. The French agricultural network on sustainable development has worked on these tools to help school communities.

A4 Social Constructivism in Practice
Presenters: Claudine de Booijs, Elly Taal and Peter Hoogenboom, the Hague University, the Hague, the Netherlands
Workshop. Target audience: General
In this workshop we’ll show you and let you experience how our teacher training faculty works for students from the social constructivism. Within the main phase of the program giving students shape their own development. The faculty has chosen training methods to give substance to the choices that students make. This consists of a number of methods that we would like to share with you. We are also curious about your ideas for upcoming colleagues to learn to make choices which are important for their development. The search for talent and encouraging a mindset of curiosity and continuous development are the central themes during this workshop.

A5 Intention of Portuguese and Luxemburgish pupils to adopt environmentally sustainable behaviours
Presenter: Astrid de Leeuw PhD, University of Luxemburg, Luxembourg
Lecture/paper. Target audience: Pre-school and Primary
This study investigates students’ beliefs regarding the adoption of pro-environmental behaviours. The participants were 149 Portuguese and 341 Luxembourgish children attending Luxembourgish primary schools. T-test results indicate that both groups had an identical sense of control, but that the Portuguese children had a slightly more positive attitude, a somewhat higher feeling of social pressure and moral obligation, and slightly higher intentions to perform the behaviours. In both groups the belief in support by parents was strongly related to their intentions. Explanations for and ways to consider these similarities and differences when planning an educational intervention are discussed.

A6 Studies of pre-school teacher perceptions
* Preservice teachers’ perceptions and attitudes toward parental discipline: When discipline becomes abuse (40 minutes)
Presenter: Dr John E. Kesner, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia USA
Teachers as mandatory reporters are legally required to report suspected maltreatment to child protective services (CPS). Of all the mandated reporters in the U.S., teachers are in a unique position to recognize the symptoms of all types of child. There are other factors which contribute to a teacher’s decision to report suspected child maltreatment. The purpose of this study was to assess pre-service teachers’ attitudes towards parental discipline techniques and child maltreatment. In addition, their responsibilities as mandated reporters and the effect of experience with children had on these factors. Authors of the paper for presentation are Dr John E Kesner and doctoral student Ms Zehra Ozturk.
* Slovene and Portuguese pre-school teachers about play and movement of pre-school children (15 minutes)
Presenters: Sanja Berčnik and Tatjana Devjak, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
The authors of this paper compare views of Slovenian and Portuguese preschool teachers about the importance of the play and movement for the preschool children. They focus on some of the personal views of the preschool teachers to the objectives of the curriculum in the field of movement activities. Play and movement are important activities in the preschool period. Through play children come to new insights on the physical, cognitive, emotional, social field, with play and movement we enable children healthy development of their personality.

PARALLEL SESSIONS B
FRIDAY 27 SEPTEMBER at 11.45 – 12.45

B1 Primary school teacher translation of UNECE competences
Presenters: Drs André de Hamer and Drs Gerben de Vries, Duurzame PABO (Sustainable teacher training), the Netherlands
Workshop. Target audience: General and Primary school
UNECE (the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe) published in 2011 a set of Educator competences for ESD. In the Netherlands Duurzame PABO (sustainable teacher training) made a translation of this set especially for primary school teachers and teacher trainer centre students. Duurzame PABO supports the implementation of these competences in Dutch schools and teacher trainer centres. During this workshop we will present and discuss our approach and results with the workshop participants.

B2 Find YOUR learning path
Presenter: Tania Farrugia, Let Me Learn Centre, Malta
Workshop. Target audience: General
We all think, feel and do things in a different way, depending on our preferred way of learning. The first step for successful learning is to understand who we are as learners and what our learning patterns are. This self awareness leads to the development of learner specific strategies maximising learning potential. By attending this interactive session, you will be able to understand what the ‘Let Me Learn’ programme is and to make the first step towards becoming an intentional learner yourself before any attempt is made to teach others.

B3 Sustainable development of teachers’ competences
Presenters: Diana Kolbe and Eveline Feldbrugge, Windesheim University of Applied Sciences, Zwolle, the Netherlands
Workshop. Target audience: General
This workshop focusses on empowerment of teaching competencies and enhancing educational research skills, attitude and critical thinking. Both topics are important for sustaining the quality of education. Influencing factors on the development of teachers competencies and their educational curiosity, will be discovered in collaboration with workshop-participants.
Do teacher training programmes contribute to sustaining the quality of education and educational innovation? Do European societies receive new impulses from creative, innovative, entrepreneurial teachers ? Do we train teachers to be evidently meaningful to every pupil based upon their reflexive attitude, curiosity, research skills, reasonable judgments and open mind. Rethink the educational system, curricula content and assessment with us!

B4 iPad as a tool for students with SEN (Special Educational Needs)
Presenters: Jessica Eriksson and Irene Lennemyr Winkler, Sundstagymnasiet, Karlstad, Sweden
Lecture. Target audience: General
Welcome to a lecture about how to use the iPad as a tool for students with special educational needs. In spring 2012 the applications and this innovative work with pupils were awarded the new Creativity Award at the Swedish SETT Fair. At the lecture you will be introduced to different ways to use the iPad, not only as an educational tool, but also as a tool for communication, for students that has no speech, and as an aid or support for cognition. With the iPad, students may be able to do things that they previously could not. Examples of our work and demonstrate what applications you can use and how students have evolved and become more independent with their iPad.

B5 Portfolio of Integration
Presenters: Alan Britton and Julie McAdam, University of Glasgow, Scotland UK
Lecture. Target audience: General
The Portfolio of Integration Project, led by Oxfam Italia, is a Comenius Multilateral Project that seeks to improve the educational outcomes of ‘new arrival’ and migrant school students in 5 countries: Greece, Italy, Poland, Turkey and UK. In these countries, the Partner organisations have undergone a Needs Analysis to assess current practice and embarked on a training programme with teachers to help improve their intercultural awareness, their classroom pedagogies and observational skills. Project members will present their findings from this major transnational project. The underlying goals of the Project relate to the desire to have more just and sustainable practices in the ways that education systems meet the needs of new arrival and migrant children.

B6 Prevention of reading comprehension problems starts in the classroom
Presenters: Christel Van Vreckem and Annemie Desoete, University college Arteveldehogeschool, Ghent, Belgium
Lecture. Target audience: Pre-school, Primary school and Secondary school
Reading comprehension is a complex multifactor, active process. Based on an overview of influencing factors and based on our conceptual model on reading comprehension (De Paepe, Desoete, Van Vreckem, & Van Hove, 2004), the focus in reading comprehension lessons should be on verbal comprehension (understanding of language in sentences (micro level), inferencing within paragraphs (meso level), inferencing within the whole text (macro level), inferencing and predicting after reading the text, activating prior knowledge and metacognition. Reading comprehensive skills appear to be one of the most modifiable skills, especially when the direct instruction model and strategy model are applied (Swanson, 1999).

PARALLEL SESSIONS C
FRIDAY 27 SEPTEMBER at 14.00 – 15.00

C1 The Global Classroom – Educating for tolerance
Presenters: Mathias Demetriades, Johanna Lund Rockliffe and Bo Kramsjö, the Global School, Visby, Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: General
How can schools include the global perspective and contribute to greater tolerance? How can teachers, through the concept of ESD, convey a more diverse and balanced image of the world? The Global School presents concepts and resources regarding human rights and intercultural understanding. You are invited to a workshop where we will critically consider established cultural constructions and engage in active learning. Welcome!

C2 ESD and Citizenship; Is Democracy up to the challenge?
Presenter: Dr Martin Fitzgerald, Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT) – Tipperary, Ireland
Lecture. Target audience: Secondary/Upper secondary school; Adult education; Higher education
In democratic societies, there is a constant battle between consumer rights and the equitable distribution of limited resources.Can this be realistically achieved in a democratic society where rights and free choice are a daily expectation? How do we educate people to want less and at the same time recognise that sustainability is a fundamental requirement for survival in a society where instantaneous gratification is literally at our fingertips through Smart Technology? Is it possible to achieve effective sustainability in a democracy or will widespread implementation of ESD concepts and practice ultimately threaten the continued existence of democracy itself?

C3 How to become a climate school
Presenters: Lone Stig Andersen and Rasmus Østerby, Thorning skole, Kjellerup, Denmark
Workshop. Target audience: General
Our school has started a project to become a climate school. We want to present our ideas, our aims with our students and our cooperation with the local society. We want to discuss with the attandents the difficulties we have met, and the inspiration we have got.We hope the attandents will inspire us as well. How can you learn the future students to be democratic and ecological thinking, how can you think sustainability in all subjects.

C4 The role of deliberate practice in the development of abilities of the gifted students – theoretical background and the research results
Presenter: Prof. Dr. hab. Beata Dyrda, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
Lecture. Target audience: General
The theoretical framework presented in this paper explains how important for the develompent of talent is intensive practice and internal motivation. The author intends to describe the idea of deliberate practise and illustrates it by the research results based on survey and interviews with musically talented students and their teachers. The research was carried out in 2012 in two artistic and musical schools.

C5 Meeting the Education Needs of New Arrival Children
Presenters: Julie E McAdam and Lesley Atkin, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland UK
Workshop. Target audience: General
Hakim has written and developed Scottish policy on meeting the needs of New Arrivals, Lesley and Hakim have developed material on building Sustainable International School Partnerships. Julie has written and developed collaborative research projects that allow New Arrival children to express their identities through visual mediums and children’s literature. Together they will share their experiences of working on a bilateral Comenius Regio project designed to support the educational needs of new Arrival children by bringing together policy, practice and theory. The workshop will describe these developments and explore how Schools and educational systems in other countries can address these issues.

C6 Educating and enhancing sustainable development of children with mathematical learning disabilities
Presenter: Annemie Desoete, University college Arteveldehogeschool & UGent University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium
Lecture. Target group: General
In Flanders 1 out of every 20 children has a Mathematical Learning Disability (MLD). MLD refers to a significant degree of impairment in the mathematical skills. In addition, children with MLD do not profit enough from (good) help. Finally, the problems in MLD cannot be totally explained by impairments in intelligence or external factors. In this session we stand still on how teachers of children with MLD can identify problems of MLD and on how they can pay attention to the inherent talents of these pupils to improve their weaknesses and to reduce obstacles.

PARALLEL SESSIONS D
FRIDAY 27 SEPTEMBER

In order to allocate free afternoon time for the conference delegates the D sessions have been renumbered and their position moved as follows:
D2 = E6
D3 = F6
D4 = A2
D5 = G6
D6 = H6

Saturday 28 September 2013

 

PARALLEL SESSIONS E
SATURDAY 28 SEPTEMBER at 10.30 – 11.30

E1/1 Learning for Sustainability in Scotland
Presenter: Alan Britton, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland UK
Lecture. 30 minutes. Target group: General
The presenter was a member of a Scottish Government Reference Group which developed proposals in 2012-2013 for a radical review of the status of sustainable development in the Scottish educational system. This review brought together sustainable development, outdoor learning and global citizenshipeducation under a more coherent organising theme of ‘Learning for Sustainability’. Together with a national strategy around renewable energy targets, this approach is designed to promote Scotland as a leading nation in relation to sustainability. The lecture will describe the policy and practice context for these developments, as well as exploring with the audience how Schools and educational sytems in other countries can address these issues.

E1/2 Prise – Analysis of sustainability in Dutch Primary Education
Presenters: Drs Gerben de Vries and Drs André de Hamer, Duurzame PABO (sustainable teacher training Netherlands), Oostburg, the Netherlands
Lecture. 30 minutes. Target group: General
‘Sustainable Teacher Training’ is a cooperation of several teacher training institutes in the Netherlands. Aim: improving sustainability in Primary Education and teacher training. STT developed an integral instrument for analysis of sustainability in PrEd. and used it at over 30 primary schools. Results are used for improvement of PrEd and teacher training; and for influence on gouvernmental policy: with a little help from that friend things are easier!

E2 Sustainable Development through the concept of IE
Presenters: Peter Dahlberg and Jessica Rundquist, Nyköpings Gymnasium, Nyköping, Sweden
Workshop. Target group: General
How can education by using the concept of IE (Identification Leads to Empathy) help to create participation in the classroom and lead to democracy, tolerance and a more sustainable society? The IE-pedagogy will be introduced by giving three authentic examples from our own classrooms. We welcome you to a workshop showing how this has been used in comparative religion, literature and human rights.

E3 Water Management in France and Morocco
Presenters: ESD Teachers Sofie Aublin and Isabelle Gaboriau, Agricultural Ministry – Research and Teaching Services, Aisy sur Armançon, France
Lecture. Target group: General
Water sustainable management in France and Morocco – From information to practical exchanges and analysis. Water resources questions are vitals; they are the heart of political and citizen debate on water quality but also on water access, distribution, use … and give supports to numerous educational actions. Young referent from the Youth World Parliament on water, the French agricultural network on sustainable development and French agricultural schools are organizing concerted educational actions. This « Sustainable Water Management » in France and Morocco has given issue to French-Moroccan partnerships in different schools in the Ouarzazate territory.
Key words : water; sustainable management; education, practical analysis, actors.

E4 The School of the Future
Presenters: Ria Vrolijk and Luuk van der Heijden, Veluwse Onderwijsgroep, Apeldoorn, the Netherlands
Open session. Target group: Pre-school and Primary school
Following a presentation about the developments in Education in the Netherlands, there will be an interactive workshop with the purpose of describing an ideal school. This will give you an opportunity to exchange (your) views and vision of a functional school building and educational concepts. During this discussion, please do not feel restricted by current frameworks, law and/or any regulations.

E5 Literacy by Design
Presenter: Dr Keith Good, Univeristy of Greenwich, London, England UK
Lecture. Target group: Pre-school and Primary school, Higher Education
The Literacy by Design project aimed to raise levels of literacy for primary school children, but particularly reluctant readers and writers, many of whom are boys. The main idea was to improve attitudes to reading and writing by ‘blending’ them with ‘hands on’ stimulation and widespread enjoyment of design and technology with literacy. Sessions culminated in the creation of interactive ‘books’. Features included: things happening when the book was opened or picked up, lights that went on then faded when text or illustrations are stroked, sounds being produced when a wand was waved over the page. Demonstrations during the session.

E6 Training teachers for the classroom of tomorrow
Presenter: Dr Rosa Doran, NUCLIO – Núcleo Interativo de Astronomia, S. D. Rana, Portugal
Workshop. 45 minutes. Target audience: General
The aim of the workshop will be to introduce educators to the tools and resources available in order to build the classroom of tomorrow. E-learning material, open source solutions, free tools will be presented. The EC is investing in brining Inquiry Based Science Education as a mean to recover the enthusiasm of students towards science. We are involved in several projects that are aiming to create a deep conscience on students on the importance of understanding our environment using Astronomy as an appealing platform. Teachers learn how to use cutting edge facilities, such as robotic telescopes in classroom environment, while teaching curriculum content.

PARALLEL PLENARY SESSIONS F
SATURDAY 28 SEPTEMBER at 11.45 – 12.45

F1 Finnish teaching practice and the influence of the new curriculum on the future of teaching
Presenters: Dr Minna Haring, Merja Kukkonen and Eija Liisa Sokka-Meaney, University Teacher Training School in Joensuu, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland
Workshop. Target group: General
The aim of this presentation is to describe the system of teacher education in Finland, with particular reference to how it is implemented in the teacher education programmes at the Joensuu Campus of the University of Eastern Finland. We will pay particular attention to the impact of certain important developments that are currently on-going in Finnish education.
At the national level, the Finnish National Board of Education is in the process of reviewing the national core curriculum for Finnish schools. The current curriculum has only been in existence since 2004, but the rapid development of technology, globalization, multiculturalism and the need for sustainable development have made changes necessary. The big issues are changes in society and in the well-being of children and families. We need to give children skills for the future and this requires new approaches to teaching and learning.
The process of curriculum renewal is interactive, i.e. at each stage of writing the curriculum comments and feedback are sought from various interested parties: teachers, teacher educators, researchers, ministries, businesses, trade unions and ethnic groups as well as pupils and parents. Teaching according to the new curriculum will begin in the autumn term in 2016.
All this also requires changes in the curriculums of teacher education programmes. These vary slightly from university to university and the different universities change their programmes at their own pace. We will concentrate on developments at the University of Eastern Finland.
We will also look at the impact of all these developments on the way in which teaching practice is carried out at the University Teacher Training School at Joensuu. Our approach to teaching practice involves combining and strengthening the link between theory and practice and developing a more theoretical approach towards tutoring, mentoring and guidance during the students’ practice periods.
Participants in the workshop will be encouraged to ask questions about and comment on the developments described.

F2 Education for Sustainable Development and Addressing Diversity
Presenters: Asst. Prof. Ayşe Kizildag and Prof. Yilmaz Suleyman, Aksaray University Faculty of Education, Aksaray, Turkey
Lecture. Target group: General
Education for sustainable development has been a hot topic of policy-making in the last decade. The concept of sustainable of development, indeed, dates back to 1987 where UN discussed the strategies to protect environment for enhanced global development. Undoubtedly, education was given the prominent role. Forthcoming years, sustainability was also enlarged to include the themes of education for all, embracing diversity, democracy and citizenship. Considering these latest modifications about education for sustainable education, this talk prioritizes policies addressing diversity via and for education. Gender, ethnicity and social class are analysed in relation to access to education for a more sustainable world.

F3 ESD with Storyline
Presenters: Barbro Carlsson, Siv Åhs and Lena Sundberg, Herrhagsskolan, Karlstad, Sweden
Workshop. Target group: Pre-school and Primary school
Storyline is a pedagogical method for active learning. It gives teachers tools for teaching sustainable development. This method motivates and encourages learners to take action for sustainable development and make good choices.The core elements of Storyline are learners´ activity, influence, collaboration, cross curricular studies, democracy training and creativity. We would like to inspire and briefly present the method and invite you to take part in some activities from the theme “The street”.

F4 What do Starting Teachers Need?
Presenters: Maurice Pauptit and Leen van der Sloot, the Hague University, the Hague, the Netherlands
Workshop. Target group: General; Higher Education
A recognized problem is that a substantial group of young teachers after a short while leave school / the profession. The task of the teacher training faculty is to train start competent teachers. The continuing professional development of teachers is a joint responsibility of schools, authorities and teacher training faculties. In the workshop you will receive the ranking results of a survey under beginning teachers, and we will look for opportunities where the following questions will serve as a focus.
Which schools offer guidance to teachers?
What are the conditions / characteristics of a good guidance.
What challenges does a beginning teacher has to stand?
How can a starting teacher become a change – agent within the school?
What do teachers need to start at the beginning of their career to play a role in a learning organization?
Methodology: In a lively process participants are challenged in the visualization, the search for solutions or creating new possibilities of this subject.

F5 Sustainable school development under systemic view – A task of school management
Presenters: Ulrich Hammerschmidt and Klaus Walter, Waldblick – Mittelschule Freital, Freital, Germany
Lecture. Target group: General
The workshop is based on the theory of social systems. The main point is that schools are complex social systems which are characterized by loosely links between their parts. This has a great influence on how to describe the system and how to manage and to develop schools and school – systems. Often school development is missing longtime effects. We show ways for school managers to create susainable development in consideration of the systemic specials of schools.

F6 Digital Participation for eco-responsive consumption: Facebook as a 2.0 education tool
Presenters: Asst. Prof. Olivier Galibert, University of Burgundy, and Asst. Prof. Cyril Masselot, University of Franche Comté, France
Lecture. 45 minutes. Target audience: General
This session highlights the participation issue in the release and education of sustainable consumption good practices and representations. Through our research field we propose to consider the ideology of democratic participation through a double injunction coming from the Internet imaginary and the principles of sustainable development. In May 2011 was published on the website of the Ministry of Environment, Sustainable Development, Transport and Logistics of France (MEDDTL), a call for funding research projects in order to understand the levers of sustainable cosumption. This program, named MOVIDA, aims to assist the government policy in accompanying consumerist changes provoced by taking into account the ecological imperative.In this inter-disciplinary research program. which also gathers psychosociologists, economists, geographs, one of the research issues is to consider the role of communications tools 2.0, particularly in mobilizing and assisting inhabitants towards sustainable consumption practices. Our project has been laureate of this funding program and we began the scientifc work since the first of January 2012.

PARALLEL SESSIONS G
SATURDAY 28 SEPTEMBER at 14.00 – 15.00

G1 The importance of education for sustainability in Portugal
Presenters: Prof. Sofia Santos and Helena Oliveira, K-Evolution, Lisbon, Portugal
Open session. Target group: General
The education of sustainability issues, together with entrepreneurship and citizenship aspects is still scarce. The challenges that society will be facing over the next 50 years implies the need to train a new generation of leaders, that naturally will respect human, ecological and cultural values. The K-Evolution, a Portuguese NGO, aims to promote such type of education by working together with the schools, teachers and parents. In this open session we aim to discuss the main issues that should be address by this type of NGO in Portugal.

G2 Don’t follow the road, find your own path!
Presenters: Drs Margriet Kat and Agatha Roozendaal, NHL university of applied sciences, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands
Workshop. Target group: General
In developing an honoursprogramma for NHL University, we defined Excellence students as people who know their talents and experience how to use them in projects which are: 1. innovative, 2. entrepreneurial, 3. multi-disciplanary, 4. talent-based and 5. valuable: add to the benefit of the world. Students find their own projects or work together in teams for an organisation or company. Everything is possible, students prove their excellence in their own way: they find their path.
In this workshop we let participants discover their talents and the way in which they use them in their work. Furthermore we will develop a format together which we all can use in our own institute. Let’s train students to use their talents for the world by starting with our own talents!

G3 You are what you read
Presenters: Asta Lantz and Charlotte Tüxen, Holmegaardskolen, Holmegaard, Denmark
Lecture. Target group: General
Through its innate potential for ‘Bildung’ literature has the ability to transforms us. It can change the way we perceive ourselves and our place in the world. How can our teaching of literature be organized to facilitate this transformation, nurture a desire for continuous learning and reading and promote the development of the potential democratic ‘Bildung’. In the interpreting community we not only learn important content but also necessary cognitive, critical and social strategies. Literary experience includes the exploration of meanings, interpretations and perspectives as well as maintaining openness to future possibilities.

G4 Entrepreneurship in the school curriculum
Presenters: Bill Goddard, University of Greenwich, and Dr Tony Hayes, Aspen Education Consultants, England UK
Open session. Target group: Pre-school, Primary school and Secondary/Upper secondary school
Entrepreneurship in the curriculum is on the current European agenda. To enable a response from teachers a change is required in the provision of learning experiences for young people. We need to explore what is necessary in terms of skills, knowledge and attitudes to enable teachers to provide their pupils with appropriate experiences and in order to acquire entrepreneurial competencies. This ‘open session’ is an opportunity for exploration of these issues, to report on current projects, and to identify the type of support needed by teachers in both initial and in-service training.

G5 Ship Sail: Jackmandora, mi nuh choose none! An autoethnographic investigation into the effects a migrant’s personal experiences have on the teaching and learning process
Presenter: Annette Kappert-White, Hotel School The Hague, the Hague, the Netherlands
Lecture. Target audience: General
According to a Higher Education Statistics Agency (HES) article; recently published in The Guardian:
94.3% of British professors are white.
1.2% of all British academics are black.
There are no black vice-chancellors in the UK.
Only 10 of the 50 black British professors are women
(Shepherd, 2011)
In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the how these trajectories have been formed and how they are experienced. This paper is part of a doctoral thesis that explores the use of personal experiences as a professional developmental tool in the teaching and learning process. It offers insight into how negative trajectories may have been created and are experienced across the generations, and answers the following questions:
1.How have my experiences influenced my educational identity, beliefs and values in the teaching and learning process?
2.How can knowledge of these findings be used to improve conditions for the migrant teacher/learner in educational institutions?

G6 Emotional aspects of school education- curricula and relationship context
Presenter: Dr Irena Przybylska, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
Paper presentation. 45 minutes. Target audience: General
The paper deliberates emotional aspects of school education. The author refers to the category of competences, reflexivity, emotional intelligence and on that basis rethinks/proposes own understanding of socio-emotional learning and competences. Consequently new dimensions of teachers’ professional competences are outlined: to teach and to build educational relationships with regard to emotional domain. The core implication for practice is to use usual situations at school to educate also socio-emotional qualities. Theoretical assumptions are strengthened by empirical data on teachers’ emotional intelligence, their knowledge and readiness to work with emotions, as well as possibilities to develop socio-emotional competences at school.

PARALLEL SESSIONS H
SATURDAY 28 SEPTEMBER at 15.30 – 16.30

H1 The Sustainable Construction Company
Presenter: Kjell Nilsson, Nyköpings gymnasium, Nyköping, Sweden
Workshop. Target group: Secondary/Upper secondary school
The Sustainable construction compay is a EU Leonardo Da Vinci partership project between schools and companies in Sweden (Nykopings gymnasium – coordinators) Germany, Ireland and Spain. The aim of the project is to build an ideal European Sustainable House that will be placed at Stockholm Skavsta international airport as an exhibition house. All countries contribute with local sustainable construction suggestions/blueprints etc. to the house. Moreover, the students will learn how to run a sustainable construction company since the project also will focus on environmental issues e.g. passive houses and entreprenurship. In addition, teaching material, how to enhance the students’ self esteem on vocational programs and ITC are also focused in the program. The communication language is English and the cooperation between countries from different climate zones makes this project very exciting and promising for the generations to come. An example of the ITC (social network) part of the project can be seen at houseofeurope.ning.com

H2 Spectrum of Inspiration – Unleashing potential
Presenters: Msc Crista Casu and Msc Louwien Eising, Stenden University, Emmen, the Netherlands
Workshop and Poster presentation. Target group: General
Stenden’s teacher training college in Emmen, the Netherlands, is using a college-wide approach to using scientific enquiry as the basis for sustainable learning. Science and technology appear to be excellent subjects for motivating teachers and children to become actively involved in their teaching and learning. Recent research has shown that, with an approach based on scientific enquiry, children can gain much from these subjects (De Vries, Custer, Dakers & Martin, 2007). The key to all this is in equipping children with the appropriate investigation skills (Harlen & Qualter, 2009). Children learn not only by observing, forming hypotheses, prediction, experimenting and making conclusions, but also through practical reasoning and design visualisation. Through this, children develop a conceptual understanding of physical phenomena, living organisms and the Earth and its environments. It is therefore important for teachers to create time and space for the children’s investigative learning.
How, in practice, do we make this sustainable?
We expect the lecturers at our teacher training college, to be not only aware of the contemporary perceptions of education, but also to consider this implications of this for the future. This means that the lecturers themselves must have an enquiring attitude to be able to pass this on to our student teachers. Within our teacher-training courses in Emmen, in The Netherlands, we are developing a sustainable investigative learning attitude as a specific learning target to become part of the natural ‘thinking style’ of our students. We achieve this by encouraging deep enquiry during our lessons and then giving the students time for reflection and ordering their thoughts. Students develop, through this experimental learning, their own versions of the processes and creativity which they will take with them into their careers and encourage the children they teach to adopt this very effective style of learning.

H3 Grow your own knowledge: research skills for sustainable school development
Presenter: Francia Kinchington, University of Greenwich, London, England UK
Lecture. Target group: Pre-school, Primary school, Secondary/Upper secondary school, Higher Education
Schools have the power to make a real difference to the knowledge base of the teaching profession. School communities with an understanding of research skills have the capacity to answer real problems associated with students, learning, pedagogy and management, to create an evidence base for sustainable educational development and change. The ability to use research skills by teachers and students is emancipatory and democratic. The creation of knowledge does not emerge only from universities – it can also emerge from your school. Why wait for ‘experts’ to tell you what to do when you can work out the answers for yourself?

H4 “Building Learning Power” – Stretching your learning muscles for the 21st century
Presenters: Drs. Anton de Vries and Herman Hoedemaker. Lumius – Stenden University, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands
Workshop. Target group: Pre-school, Primary school and Secondary/Upper secondary school
Building Learning Power is about helping young people to become better learners, both in school and out. It is about creating a culture in classrooms – and in the school more widely – that systematically cultivates habits and attitudes that enable young people to face difficulty and uncertainty calmly, confidently and creatively.Within this context, BLP provides two frameworks. The first is a coherent picture of what the powerful learner is like. The second is a route map of how schools can build the constituent dispositions of the powerful learner.In this workshop your ‘learning muscles’ will be activated by 2 Dutch BLP trainers.

H5 A web-based educational computer assistant software application for clock reading
Presenter: Veerle van Vooren, University college Arteveldehogeschool, Ghent, Belgium
Lecture. Target group: Pre-school and Primary school
Building on the finding that a large number of primary school children struggle with the acquisition of the procedural and conceptual knowledge of clock reading and that teachers lack adequate specialized content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and curricular knowledge on the subject, the present study reports on the development of a web-based educational computer assistant software application for clock reading. In the development of this open-source website, we build on recent research results. As such, this software package aims to help teachers and therapists to address clock reading problems in children in a more efficient way using their regular curriculum programs.

H6 Creative Mathematic activities
Presenter: Sandra dos Anjos Canário Custódio Ribeiro, EB I D. Carlos I, Sintra, Portugal
Lecture. 45 minutes. Target audience: Pre-school and Primary school
The workshop will display some activities in creative mathematics for students of elementary and junior high school. Examples of activities about counting and calculation for elementary school students will be discussed as well as methods for and activities in teaching and learning different meanings of fractions to junior high school students. This topic is chosen because the study of fractions is not limited to learning the part/whole relationship but is related to the teaching of most teachers.

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Education for Sustainable Development: Resources

 

Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) allows every human being to acquire the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values necessary to shape a sustainable future. Education for Sustainable Development means including key sustainable development issues into teaching and learning. ESD supports five fundamental types of learning to provide quality education and foster sustainable human development: * Learning to know; * Learning to be; * Learning to live together; * Learning to do; * Learning to transform oneself and society.

UNESCO is the lead agency for the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005-2014).

Read full information about ESD on the UNESCO website.

Download the ESD Source Book (pdf)

In November 2010 the Council of the European Union adopted conclusions on Education for sustainable development (ESD), which shall impact on all governments and educational systems in Europe. The European Council Conclusions on ESD (pdf)

Videos for use in schools and training

The education for sustainable development professional development videos for primary and secondary teachers as well as educational decision-makers are now online. They are open to the public at no charge from the UNESCO Multi-Media Video Archives.

The five videos in the series are:

  • Education for Sustainable Development: Preparing for the future
    (20 minutes)
    This video explores the question of how are we preparing the students of today for an uncertain future affected by climate change and other threats to sustainability on the planet.
    Audience Educational administrators and policy-makers
  • Education for Sustainable Development: Building support systems
    (28 minutes)
    This video examines many components necessary to integrated education for sustainable development into school systems. It involves: curricular and instructional change, assessment, leadership, capacity development, supporting innovation, the importance of political will, social media, etc.
    Audience: Educational administrators and policy-makers.
  • Education for Sustainable Development: Teachers sharing with teachers
    (18 minutes)
    A teacher from Grenada and one from Canada describe their ways of teaching sustainability. The students’ reactions to learning are also recorded.
    Audience: Primary and secondary teachers as well as teacher educators
  • Education for Sustainable Development: Pedagogy – Active learning
    (16 minutes)
    This video captures education for sustainable development pedagogy used in Ireland. This view of secondary school mathematics classroom shows student-centred, participatory pedagogy in action, recording insights from both the teacher and students.
    Audience: Primary and secondary teachers as well as teacher educators
  • Education for Sustainable Development: Inside classrooms in India
    (22 minutes)
    Education for sustainable development (ESD) is supposed to be implemented in locally relevant and culturally appropriate ways. This video capture the voices of administrators, teachers, and students in India, showing their unique and yet universal ways of implementing ESD.