The 7th International Conference: “Leadership for an Inclusive and Sustainable World”

 

The 7th International Conference was held at the five star Radisson Blu Hotel in Berlin, Germany on January 27-29, 2011. The title of the conference was “Leadership for an Inclusive and Sustainable World”.

Thematically the conference addressed Leadership but interlinking with Inclusion and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD).

The topics were introduced by internationally recognized experts in the thematic areas, followed by seminars and parallel sessions of lectures and workshops. Four high profile keynote speakers and 169 participants from 25 countries and from all levels of education and training gathered together to exchange and share front-line knowledge and good practice.

Conference Venue

The 7th International Conference was held at the five star Radisson Blu Hotel in Berlin, Germany on January 27-29, 2011.

The conference rooms on the ground floor were designed with high-quality wood and furnished with fresh tones, all providing for a pleasant atmosphere.

The conference foyer, which lies in the middle of the conference area, spreads over 530 m² and is flooded with warm, natural light. The foyer is graced with a futuristic glass roof, which allowed the outside to come in and invigorate delegates and guests with a burst of natural light.

Conference delegates were accommodated at the hotel, with a choice of single or double rooms. All rooms, each providing exceptional views of the Berlin cityscape, feature free high-speed Internet access (wired and wireless) and convenient amenities including coffee and tea maker, international television stations, and well-equipped bathrooms.

A definite highlight for every event is the AquaDom, the world’s largest cylindrical aquarium with 1 million litres of salt-water, situated at the lobby of the hotel. The two-story elevator accommodates 47 people and each ride takes about 10 minutes, giving delegates plenty of time to get a close view of hundreds of exotic fish.

Conference Programme

Thursday January 27th 2011
16h30-17h45 Registration of delegates
18h00 Cultural Performance followed by the Opening Session with Words of Welcome by Honoured guests from
– The Senate Department/Ministry for Education, Science and Research
– The European Commission Representation in Germany
– Das Landesinsitut für Schulen und Medien (LISUM) Berlin-Brandenburg
– Pädagogischer Austauschdienst (PAD) der Kultusministerkonferenz – the German National Agency for EU Programmes
– The UNESCO
– The President of the Learning Teacher Network
19h00 Plenary: Prof. Wessel Ganzevoort, Amsterdam the Netherlands:
‘Leading learning organzation to excellence’
20h30 Conference Gala Dinner

Friday January 28th 2011
09h00 Plenary: Prof. Joan Poliner Shapiro, Philadelphia USA:
‘Ethical Educational Leadership’
10h00 Coffee break
10h30 Parallel Sessions A
11h45 Parallel Sessions B
13h00 Lunch
14h00 Parallel Sessions C
15h30 Free time for networking
19h00 Reception at the Berlin Town Hall
with welcome by the Head of the Senate Chancellery

Saturday January 29th 2011
09h00 Plenary: ESA Astronaut, Prof. Christer Fuglesang:
‘Flying in space, for the benefit of Earth’
10h00 Coffee break
10h30 Parallel Sessions D
11h45 Parallel Sessions E
13h00 Lunch
14h00 Parallel Sessions F
15h00 Coffee break
15h30 Parallel sessions G
16h45 Cultural Programme and Closing Ceremonies

Keynote Speakers

Ethical Educational Leadership: Decision Making
Prof. Joan Poliner Shapiro, Philadelphia, USA

This presentation will provide a framework to help educators make ethical decisions. It will introduce participants to the Multiple Ethical Paradigms of justice, critique, care and the profession, developed by Joan Poliner Shapiro and Jacqueline A. Stefkovich. It will also provide examples, using two ethical dilemmas, of how to utilize the paradigms. One case will focus on making decisions involving gender issues and the other will deal with deciding what to do under very turbulent conditions. In the latter case, Turbulence Theory, designed by Steven Jay Gross, will be introduced. The hope is that those educators who attend the presentation will feel more confident about making challenging ethical decisions in the future.

Joan Poliner Shapiro is Professor of Educational Administration at Temple University’s College of Education in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Previously, she served as Associate Dean for Research and as Chair of her department at Temple. She also has been Co-Director of Women’s Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, taught in secondary schools in the United States and United Kingdom, and supervised intern teachers. Currently, she is the Vice President of Temple’s Faculty Senate and the Co-Founder of the New DEEL (Democratic Ethical Educational Leadership). She holds a doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania and completed post-doctoral work at the University of London’s Institute of Education. Most recently, she received the Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award and the University Council of Educational Administration’s Master Professor Award. She has co-authored six books and written over 50 journal articles and chapters in edited books. Her work focuses on gender issues and ethical leadership in education.

 

 

Leading learning organization to excellence
Prof. Wessel Ganzevoort, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

First of all we have to understand what an organization is, what is the hidden paradigm. We often talk in post modern words and keep thinking in modern terms. What is a workable metaphor? Organizations as living and learning organisms. Organization developing from hand to brains to hearts and souls. Professionals are more than brains. The starting point of all leadership and organization development is the essence or the soul. How can we develop our essence? Creation or reaction. What is effective leadership in a learning organization and how can we transform our organization into a high performing organization (HPO)? What are the preconditions in which people can let their qualities unfold? The role of trust. And how this contributes to a sustainable world?

Professor J. Wessel Ganzevoort joined KPMG in 1970 as a management consultant. He studied business administration, economics and social psychology. Since 1982 he served KPMG in various management positions: as chairman of the Dutch practice, as chairman of KPMG’s European consulting activities and as deputy chairman for global consulting. From 1994 to 1996 he was president of the Netherlands Association of Management consultancy Firms (ROA).

From 1996 to 1999 Wessel Ganzevoort was responsible for KPMG Inspire Foundation, an innovation and research center of KPMG. Since 1998 he teaches organization dynamics and innovation at the University of Amsterdam. Since he left KPMG in January 2000 he has been non executive chairman and boardmember of several companies and institutions and is active as a boardroom consultant and coach for topteams and individual executives. His areas of expertise are strategy, leadership and organization development.

 

Flying in space, for the benefit of Earth
ESA Astronaut, Prof. Christer Fuglesang

Orbiting around Earth, 350 km up in space, and looking down on our beautiful world, one cannot avoid thinking about how fragile it seems in some respects. The atmosphere, in particular, looks very thin. In a space station we have to recycle and reuse as much as possible and sustainability is a prerequisite. In some sense Earth is just a very large space vehicle and many interesting and thoughtful analogies can be made. Humankind might have learnt more about Earth and our place in the universe from observations in space than from any other source of data. Another aspect of space flights is the teamwork and preparations necessary for successful space missions. For example, on ISS we were 13 people from 5 countries and we worked together without the slightest friction solving many problems. You don’t see borders between countries from space and you wish all people on Earth could do the same.

ESA (formerly stationed at NASA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang is docent and affiliated professor of experimental particle physics at Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stockholm Sweden. He has received special honours as Honorary Doctorate from Umeå University, Sweden; Honorary Doctorate from the University of Nova Gorica, Slovenia; NASA Space Flight Medal; and the H.M. the Swedish King’s Medal.

In 1989, he became a Senior Fellow of CERN, where he worked as head of the particle identification subdetector. In November 1990, Fuglesang obtained a position at the Manne Siegbahn Institute of Physics, Stockholm.

In 1992, Fuglesang was selected to join the European Astronaut Corps, where he completed basic training at the European Astronaut Centre (EAC) the following year. In 1993, he commenced training at GCTC in preparation for their flight engineer tasks, extravehicular activities (spacewalks) and operation of the Soyuz spacecraft. In 1995 he was selected as member of Crew 2 for the Euromir 95 mission, where after in 1996 he underwent specialized training on Soyuz operations for undocking, atmospheric re-entry and landing.

In August 1996 at NASA, Fuglesang entered the Mission Specialist Class at NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston. He qualified for flight assignment as a Mission Specialist in 1998 and was also awarded the Russian ‘Soyuz Return Commander’ certificate, which qualifies him to command a three-person Soyuz capsule on its return from space.

Following an assignment from 2002, from December 9-22, 2006, Christer Fuglesang flew as a Mission Specialist on Space Shuttle Discovery on STS-116 to the International Space Station (ISS). Fuglesang participated in his second spaceflight from August 29 to September 12, 2009 as a Mission Specialist on Space Shuttle Discovery on STS-128 to the International Space Station.

A veteran of two spaceflights, Christer Fuglesang has logged over 641 hours in space, including 5 EVAs (spacewalks) totalling 31 hours and 54 minutes.

 

Seminar leader

The midway point of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development
Introduction by Prof. Charles Hopkins, York University, Toronto, Canada

The UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development has reached the midway point. At the midpoint review held in Bonn, ministers of education and other senior formal education officials from around the world met to capture what had been accomplish, what had been learned to date and what remained to be accomplished in the remaining half Decade. Much of this discussion regarding the way forward for formal education was captured in the Bonn Declaration. This Declaration is a road map drafted by 30 senior officials representing the 6 UN regions worldwide.
Charles Hopkins chaired the drafting committee and will share insight and discuss the key recommendations as they apply to teachers, schools and school systems.

Charles Hopkins is currently the UNESCO Chair at York University in Toronto, Canada where he coordinates an international network of teacher education institutions from 55 countries collaboratively working upon the reorientation of elementary and secondary teacher education to address sustainable development. Hopkins is also a United Nations University (UNU) Chair on Education for Sustainable Development, developing Regional Centers of Expertise in (ESD) globally.

Charles, as a former Superintendent with the Toronto Board of Education and as a long time leader in the fields of education and ESD, lectures and meets with education leaders around the world.

Overview of conference sessions

Thursday 27 January 2011
Plenary Session
18.00–18.50 Opening Session and Cultural Programme
19.00-20.00 Keynote Address by Prof. Wessel Ganzevoort, the Netherlands
20.30 Conference Banquet at the Dom Lounge (top floor of the Radisson Blu Hotel)

Friday 28 January 2011
09.00–10.00 Plenary Session
Keynote Address by Prof. Joan Poliner Shapiro, USA
Coffee
Parallel Sessions
10.30–11.30 A1 A2 A3 A4
11.45–12.45 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6
Lunch
14.00–15.30 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6
Free time for networking
19.00 Reception at the Berlin Town Hall

Saturday 29 January 2011
09.00–10.00 Plenary Session
Keynote Address by Prof. Christer Fuglesang
Coffee
Parallel Sessions
10.30–11.30 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6
11.45–12.45 E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6
Lunch
14.00–15.00 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6
Coffee
15.30–16.30 G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6
Closing Session
16.45–17.15 Cultural Programme and Closing Words

List of parallel sessions

A1 ‘I think I can make a difference!’
A2 The 9 universal criteria of talent (and how to deal with it)
A3 Learning by design
A4 SEMINAR The midway point of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development
B1 Business and morality – Challenges for ESD in teacher education
B2 Hunger for meaning – Guiding a philosophical dialogue
B3 Welcoming them back to school
B4 Leader skills in the classroom – Making the students’ voices heard
B5 Global Learning: Sharing perspectives
B6 Deficits with implementing ESD: Results of an international survey on UNESCO’s action goals and approaches to these issues
C1 Coaching in leadership
C2 Promoting Gender Equality in STEM classrooms
C3 Building an effective and sustainable leadership learning community
C4 LEGO®SERIOUS PLAY™
C5 Embedding Global Learning in Teacher Education: a Partnership with Schools and a local Development Education Centre
C6 Leadership from a sustainable and ethical perspective
D1 Why and how leadership in schools can be learnt
D2 Positive networking in the kindergarten
D3 Release the teachers – Leading through high performance teams
D4 Measuring educational effectiveness for ensuring sustainable development
D5 Internationalization of teacher education programs in the US: One example and discussion of issues
D6 Moving towards a European global learning journey
E1 Collaborative learning in rural locations
E2 Education concentrated to multi-sided personal development
E3 Leadership challenges in music education
E4 LEGO® System for Learning
E5 Learning to live together in peace: The central axis of early childhood education for a sustainable world
E6 Education for sustainable development – More than just waste disposal
F1 Leadership or management?
F2 Gender Mainstreaming
F3 School democratic governance and sustainable development
F4 Social networks as a tool for diversity
F5 Economic stability for inclusion by using paraprofessionals in education
F6 Yes we can! How to become a committed leader for ESD
G1 How pupils explore their lifestyles and their approach to sustainability
G2 No session
G3 The leadership role of the principal in inclusionary practice
G4 Can transformational learning enhance leadership in schools?
G5 Learning by walking. A model for sustainable field trip learning
G6 Generations Up! How generations work and learn

Friday 28 January 2011

PARALLEL SESSIONS
FRIDAY 28 JANUARY at 10.30 – 11.30

A1 ‘I think I can make a difference!’
Presenter: Jacinta McCarthy, Scoil na Croise Naofa, Cork, Ireland
Workshop. Target audience: General
Teachers have the potential to become change agents in their schools through their involvement in professional learning communities. This work-shop briefly presents one case study where teachers in one school became leaders of change and innovation as a result of their own professional development. They changed not only their own work practices but the practices of colleagues in their school, as those colleagues in turn began to value the positive effects of different work practices on student learning. Participants of this work-shop will engage in activities that will encourage them to examine their own work practices, questioning the need for change and exploring the possibility of taking steps to make those changes in their schools.

A2 The 9 universal criteria of talent (and how to deal with it)
Presenters: Drs. Anton de Vries and Roy Meulman, Instituut Service Management, Stenden University, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands
Workshop. Target audience: General
Who are the most top talented people, how can we recognize them? Are there mutual characteristics and what makes them different from ‘normally talented’ people? What can we learn from highly talented athletes, trainers and sports coaches? What does this mean in running your school and managing teachers, what does this mean when your teaching the children?
In this workshop you will be given information about the 9 universal criteria of talent, such as: reducing complexity, authenticity+ creativity, passion, proactive problem solving etc. We will also start a dialogue about what this means to your personal leadership as an educational leader or a teacher.

A3 Learning by design
Presenter: Steve Hall, Summit Education, Stafford, England UK
Lecture. Target audience: General
Learning by Design is a concept that brings together current thinking about learning, leadership and curriculum development and applies design processes so that learning can be made more relevant, accessible and contextualised. Through looking at the design of learning spaces, the design of learning activities and the design of leadership structures which support and facilitate learning and by doing this in collaboration with the learners themselves we can arrive at much more meaningful academic and vocational learning experiences. By considering the processes by which learning can be ‘designed’ rather than merely ‘delivered’ we can better address the important issues for 21st century learners such as education for sustainable development and the (re)building of social and cultural capital.

A4 SEMINAR: The midway point of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development
Introduction by Prof. Charles Hopkins, York University, Toronto, Canada
Seminar. Target audience: General
The UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development has reached the midway point. At the midpoint review held in Bonn, ministers of education and other senior formal education officials from around the world met to capture what had been accomplish, what had been learned to date and what remained to be accomplished in the remaining half Decade. Much of this discussion regarding the way forward for formal education was captured in the Bonn Declaration. This Declaration is a road map drafted by 30 senior officials representing the 6 UN regions worldwide.
Charles Hopkins chaired the drafting committee and will share insight and discuss the key recommendations as they apply to teachers, schools and school systems.

PARALLEL SESSIONS
FRIDAY 28 JANUARY at 11.45 – 12.45

B1 Business and morality: Challenges for ESD in teacher education
Presenter: Dr. Martin Fitzgerald, Tipperary Institute, Ireland
Workshop. Target audience: Secondary/upper secondary school; Higher education
This is the second part of an Action Research project that began in 2009 looking into the challenges facing student teachers who are training to be teachers of Business and Religious studies. On this occasion student teachers in their final year were asked to teach specific classes on ESD while out on Teaching Practice in both Business and Religion. This session will look at the findings from this research, the student experience and the learning to be gained in relation to ESD and teacher Education at second level.

B2 Hunger for meaning – Guiding a philosophical dialogue
Presenter: Maria Luisa Abreu, Associação de Professores de Sintra (APS), Sintra, Portugal
Workshop. Target audience: General
Just like us, adults, our students need to understand their experiences and take the right decisions in the world they live. As teachers, it’s our job to facilitate the discussions within the classroom community, stimulating them to reason logically and more meaningfully, helping them become more thoughtful, more reflective and more reasonable, improving their capacity of judgment.
This session will be a model of a philosophical dialogue, where participants are invited to participate in a real democratic “community of inquiry”, practicing the methodology of the Philosophy for Children program, which improves critic and creative thinking, a methodology useful for all ages.

B3 Welcoming them back to school
Presenter: Karin Waldemarsson, VIVA Komvux, Umeå, Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: Upper secondary; Adult education; Higher education
2008 14,9% young people in Europe left school with at most lower secondary school. An upper secondary school education is generally considered as a minimum for taking part in a knowledge based society either for entering the labour market or further/higher education. So the early school leavers need to come back to education as adults to complete upper secondary school education. Researches point to a positive relationship between education level and a reduced risk for unemployment and more training opportunities. How can early school leavers be motivated and inspired to come back to education as adults? How can teachers lead and support them to complete their studies a second time?.

B4 Leader skills in the classroom – Making the students’ voices heard
Presenters: Malin Tengdahl and Mathias Demetriades, the Global School at the International Programme Office for Education and training, Sweden
Workshop. Target group: General.
How can the perspective of ESD be utilized in the classroom so that students become more active and ultimately more prepared for society outside of school? At this session the Global School demonstrates how ESD can equip the teacher on an everyday basis and how students can achieve better results through interactive and innovative teaching skills.

B5 Global Learning: Sharing perspectives
Presenters: Stewart L. Hay, Global Classroom Shetland Islands Council, Lerwick, Shetland Islands, the United Kingdom
Nils-Olov Hagman and Leif Thorsson, Bobergsgymnasiet, Ånge, Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: Pre-school and Primary; Secondary and upper secondary.
The workshop aims to share examples of shared learning within a network of schools throughout Europe, North America, Australasia and South Africa. The programme involves senior High and Primary school students working in collaboration with teachers to design develop and implement aspects of their own curriculum on commonly identified themes., Work is shared through website and by video conferencing. (See www.global-classroom.org – Reference Global Ambition)

B6 Deficits with implementing ESD: Results of an international survey on UNESCO’s action goals and approaches to these issues
Presenter: Dieter Gross, Sustainable Future Instructions (SFI); VDSG e.V: spokesman for ESD, Berlin, Germany
Lecture. Target group: General; Secondary/Upper secondary school; Higher education
There are still obstacles and barriers in implementing ESD. This was the reason why UNESCO and the participants of the World Conference (2009) have adopted Action Goals for the 2nd Half of the Decade. However these goals lack a prioritized ranking which causes that there is no targeted strategy. Which goals have a top priority and which are dependent on substantial support? An international survey within a German-Japanese Cooperation Project on DESD has exhibited the drivers and barriers. This may open the opportunity to readjust the focus and support UNESCO’s and the stakeholders’ efforts in implementing ESD till the end of the Decade and beyond.

PARALLEL SESSIONS
FRIDAY 28 JANUARY at 14.00 – 15.30

C1 Coaching in leadership
Presenters: Peter Hoogenboom, Elly Taal, Leen van der Sloot and Maurice Pauptit, The Hague University, the Hague, the Netherlands
Workshop. 90 minutes. Target audience: General
Coaching is an essential part of good leadership. In an interactive workshop we will try to show you how creativity can be used to achieve change in behaviour – for yourselves, your people and your team.

We hope to demonstrate how to use coaching skills. We will show you how to manage a process by changing the attitude and involvement of the participants in that process.

C2 Promoting Gender Equality in STEM classrooms
Presenters: Dr. Bernhard Ertl, Universität der Bundeswehr München, Germany
Renia Papanastasiou, IACM/FORTH, Greece
Catherine Lockhead-Strzepka, University of Information Technology and Management, Poland
Open session. 90 minutes. Target audience: Secondary/upper secondary; Higher education
The session focuses on the promotion of gender equality in STEM classrooms. This aims, besides increasing the share in STEM careers, at providing equal chances for males and females and thereby at reaching sustainable development. The open session will comprise of four thematic inputs regarding gender phenomena in STEM classrooms, causes for these phenomena, teacher roles and solutions, and an outlook on facilitating sustainable development. These inputs guide an open discussion between the presenters and the participants to exchange experiences and best practices.

C3 Building an effective and sustainable leadership learning community
Presenters: Tom Whittingham, Southern Educational Leadership Trust (SELT), Kent, England UK
Bill Goddard, the University of Greenwich, England UK
Dr. Tony Hayes, Aspen Consultants, England UK
Lecture. 60 minutes. Target audience: General
The session will look at the building and development of an effective leadership learning community. There are a number of key elements and activities that are needed (and these will be explored in the session) in order to ensure that a community is sustainable e.g. connectivity, innovation and creativity, learning conversations/coaching, emotional resilience, research and enquiry. However, the work must always have a clear focus on the needs of the specific community that the ‘leader’ serves and a desire to build capacity, learning and raise performance in others, today and in the future.

C4 LEGO®SERIOUS PLAY™
Presenters: Jesper Just Jensen and Hasse Højland, LEGO Education, Billund, Denmark
Workshop. 90 minutes. Target audience: General
LEGO SERIOUS PLAY for education is a new concept developed for schools. The concept is designed to enable students to work together to build expressions of their understanding of the world around them. It is a method that teachers have credited for being remarkably inclusive and that helps to develop students’ self-expression, self-esteem, and confidence as well as activate and enhance their creative thinking and collaboration skills.
This workshop gives you an opportunity to try out LEGO SERIOUS PLAY first hand.

C5 Embedding Global Learning in Teacher Education: a Partnership with Schools and a local Development Education Centre
Presenters: Helen Gadsby and Andrea Bullivant, Education Faculty, Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool, England UK
Lecture. 60 minutes. Target audience: General
This session will share key achievements and learning from a three year project to embed global learning, including education for sustainable development and active global citizenship, within teacher education and training at Liverpool Hope University. Achievements include: embedding global learning across a range of courses; developing students, tutors and teachers critical understanding and ensuring links are made between learning and action; establishing strong partnerships with schools and local NGOs; and sustaining the impact of the project in the long term. The session will focus on the impact of the project both within the university and on practice in schools, with reference to recent education agendas and policies in the UK.

C6 Leadership from a sustainable and ethical perspective
Presenters: Liz Berg, Per Hällström and Margareta Hjälte, Sweden
Workshop. 90 minutes.
Target audience: General
A group of Swedish and Ugandan headteachers have carried out a joint school development project with a focus on education for sustainable development. The project evolved and deepened on the issue of leadership from a sustainable and ethical perspective. Many experiences have been made and learned from and have become very useful in the daily work situations. We will share some of these experiences through a presentation and discussion.

Saturday 29 January 2011

PARALLEL SESSIONS
SATURDAY 29 JANUARY at 10.30 – 11.30

D1 Why and how leadership in schools can be learnt
Presenter: Felix Russwinkel, Foundation of German Business, Berlin, Germany
Lecture. Target group: General; Adult education
The Foundation of German Business (Stiftung der Deutschen Wirtschaft) aims to provide young people with the best possible conditions for a good start to a successful and fulfilling professional career. Therefore, we need a high quality educational system and a continuous training of the institutional leaders of the system. In the area of School & Business, we train management skills of future and actual headmasters. Professional qualification, consultation with CEOs and coaching are elements of developing leaders in schools. The contribution will give an overview of the experiences after 100 headteachers have passed through the program.

D2 Positive networking in the kindergarten
Presenters: Tatjana Prešern and Tina Merčnik, Vrtec Hansa Christiana Andersena, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Workshop. Target audience: Pre-school and Primary school
We work at a kindergarten/pre-school with over 140 employees and 750 children and their parents. Leading this kind of kindergarten is a big challenge for the principal and her team. On the conference we will present our kind of leadership on different levels of the kindergarten. Our best practice is positive networking between employees, parents, grandparents and others involved into the kindergarten. With this kind of leadership we increase our quality in all sectors. We get new people that are helping us to make our kindergarten stimulating to our children and with our work and enviroment we are giving our children new opportunities to develop.

D3 Release the teachers – Leading through high performance teams
Presenters: Bjarne Schuricht, Anne Buhl Jørgensen, Kenneth Højland and Rita Mindested, Egebjergskolen, Horsens, Denmark
Workshop. Target audience: General
In a hyper complex society with more and more diagnosed children included in the classroom, the limits of normal teaching are extended to a degree never seen before. Our teachers are met with demands of larger specialising as regards to professionalism, teaching and flexibility to other pupils/students and their parents, while navigating in a public debate often very critical as to the idea of inclusion. Through examples, theories and statements we would like to show how we have succeeded in generating new energy to the teachers and through coaching and mentoring have gained a high performing team and thereby optimized the effort in this particular area in the school. The method is recommendable in all relations as regards to leadership and collaborators, where the modern leader wishes to optimize to self leading teams. The form of the session will be introduction and round table discussion.

D4 Measuring educational effectiveness for ensuring sustainable development
Presenters:
Dr. Bernhard Ertl, Universität der Bundeswehr, Germany
Renia Papanastasiou, IACM/FORTH, Greece
Catherine Lockhead-Strzepka, University of Information Technology and Management, Poland
Open session. Target audience: General; Adult education; Higher education
The session focuses on educational effectiveness for ensuring sustainable development. The key issues relate to the evaluation of innovation on policy level as well as on a practice level. This aims at discovering long term effects of innovation which are the key to sustainability. The open session will comprise of thematic inputs regarding the evaluation of innovation, evaluation methods, and an outlook on how evaluation can facilitate sustainable development. These inputs guide an open discussion between the presenters and the participants to exchange experiences and best practices.

D5 Internationalization of teacher education programs in the US: One example and and discussion of issues
Presenter: Ass. Prof. John E. Kesner PhD, College of Education, Georgia State University, Atlanta, USA
Open session. Target audience: Higher education
With both the US and the Europe dealing with an ever increasing multicultural environment, promoting understanding between the peoples of different cultures and improving the quality of their interactions is paramount. In order to meet this challenge a new generation of globally literate educators and educational leaders is needed.
Faced with a rigidly proscriptive teacher education program and a mandate to create more globally literate teachers, one teacher education program in the US has created an innovative new program which will prepare students to become effective teachers and equip them to be able to understand and appreciate a global perspective.
The Department of Early Childhood Education in the College of Education at Georgia State University in Atlanta , Georgia USA is designing an undergraduate teacher education program in which students complete all required courses and school practices while spending a significant portion of their program overseas engaged in coursework and school practice. In an “Open Session” discussion format, this new program will be described and discussed. Feedback will be solicited from session participants. In addition, a general discussion about internationalization of teacher education programs in the US and the unique problems involved will be held.

D6 Moving towards a European Global Learning Journey
Presenters: Christer Torstensson and Johanna Lund, the Global School, Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: General
Imagine participating in a European multilateral group of schools teams, travelling on a journey to a third-world developing country to study poverty related issues, sustainable development and intercultural dialogue, while at the same time developing the own school-curricula, in cooperation with the other teams.
The project has been running for ten years in Sweden, for Swedish school teams, with very positive results. But is it feasible on a European level? The workshop will discuss aims and objectives, methods and benefits.

PARALLEL SESSIONS
SATURDAY 29 JANUARY at 11.45 – 12.45

E1 Collaborative learning in rural locations
Presenters: Bill Houldsworth, Devon Learning and Development Partnership, Exeter, England UK
Robert Cross, Stokeinteignhead Primary School, Stokeinteignhead, England UK
Ian Hemelik, Manor Primary School, Devon, England UK
Lecture. Target audience: General
The South West UK region of Devon constitutes a large number of small rural primary and secondary schools and has for a few years promoted the concept of system leadership and collaborative practice through a variety of different models of leadership. This seminar will explore the findings of some of the sustainable models from current practice as well as investigate the emerging themes from a bilateral Regio project engaged with the similar rural region of Galicia, Spain, where ICT pedagogy development is being used as the vehicle for collaborative learning. Universities of Santiago da Compestella and Marjon, Plymouth are also engaged in the Regio project.

E2 Education concentrated to multi-sided personal development
Presenter: Ewa Szadzinska, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
Lecture. Target audience: General
The theory of many-sided education W. Okoń in didactics was formed over many years (1965-2010). Research verifies that didactic strategies focus on emotional, practice, intellectual activites to allow personal development. Only development can support emancipation in society.

E3 Leadership challenges in music education
Presenters: Margaretha Grahn, PhD, and Christel Öfverström, PhL, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden
Lecture. Target audience: General
At this session will be presented an article about leadership in general, classroom leadership and leadership challenges in music education. One classical question is if leadership comes naturally or if it can be learned? Many authors mean that it is both. We have used ”The Leadership Diamond” by Koestenbaum (1991). One of the great issues in leadership is the balance between chaos and order, structure and creativity, planning and spontaneity. Denhardt & Denhardt (2008) compare being a leader with dancers and musicians and emphasize the importance of having theoretical knowledge connected with practise and the ability of improvisation. Another important aspect is time to reflect.

E4 LEGO® System for Learning
Presenters: Hasse Højland and Jesper Just Jensen, LEGO Education, Billund, Denmark
Workshop/lecture. Target audience: General
Why are LEGO bricks so pertinent to a 21st century classroom?
The LEGO system is unlike many other systems for learning because it offers endless possibilities for students to explore, combine and transform things. Systems that allow students to do this, to simultaneously make sense of the world and give form to their imagination, facilitate creativity and innovation like no other. We call this systematic creativity.

E5 Learning to live together in peace: The central axis of early childhood education for a sustainable world
Presenter: Osagie A. Egbe, World Association of Early Childhood Educators, Nigeria Chapter, Benin City, Nigeria
Lecture. Target audience: Pre-school and primary school
It is well demonstrated that the first years of life are the most relevant to the development of the human being at this stage the fundamental basis for the development of personality are established on which the following phases of life will be consolidated and improved. For this reason we have established this project to educate from childhood in the noble art of living together in peace. To provide school teachers with elements that will help them educate the youngest children in love and respect for their fellow man for leadership and sustainable world.

E6 Education for sustainable development – More than just waste disposal
Presenter: Petronella Odhner and Hans Ljungqvist, The Global School, Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: General
In this seminar The Global School presents the depth and variety within the concept of ESD where teachers from all kinds of levels, from Pre-school to Upper Secondary School, can benefit and contribute. Many examples from different schools in Sweden are discussed in this seminar.

PARALLEL SESSIONS
SATURDAY 29 JANUARY at 14.00 – 15.00

F1 Leadership or management?
Presenters: Herman Hoedemaker and Pieter Oosterhof, Instituut Service Management at Stenden University, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands
Workshop. Target audience: General
A lot of school organisations are struggling in leadership. How can we motivate and inspire people, to bring the best up and how can we get good results?
In this workshop we will discover, from the inside, our strength in (personal) leadership. Your own biography is leading in this session.
In other words, by telling your own story you will discover your strength in leadership.
Multiple intelligence is leading in the form of this workshop.

F2 Gender Mainstreaming
Presenters: Marianne Nilsson and Staffan Stråhle, Kronoparkens skolområde, Karlstad, Sweden
Lecture. Target audience: General; Pre-school/Primary; Secondary/upper secondary school
The City of Karlstad has the comprehensive goal to be one of the best cities in Sweden to live in regarding gender equality.
Regarding education, the municipality has employed two gender educators as support to all schools and preschools to achieve this goal. Together with head teachers and teachers they help to make sustainable structures and new patterns for the teachers and children to fully understand what equal rights and opportunities for girls and boys mean. The lecture gives an overview of Gender Mainstreaming in schools.

F3 School democratic governance and sustainable development
Presenters: Marie-Odile Nouvelot-Gueroult, AgroSup Dijon, Dijon, France
Lena Leducq, Education for sustainable development, Pays de Loire, France
Nathalie Droyer, AgroSup Dijon, Dijon, France
Open session. Target audience: Secondary/Upper secondary schools; Higher education
How to implement democratic governance in secondary schools in concrete terms? We shall present the first results about a « New school governance » experimentation that we are leading for one-year now, based on reflective practice and research to manage better the processes of school projects with all the stakeholders, including the students.
This action research has been designed in 2009 to meet the needs of School Headteachers and the key assumptions of sustainable development. We are exploring the perception that staff and students have of the implementation of sustainable development in their school and the way in which it could be developed to gain in effectiveness, coherence and empowerment. During the session we shall present our theoretical framework and a concrete example of the impact of this action research on the governance of the agricultural college of Nantes-Saint Herblain (FR)

F4 Social networks as a tool for diversity
Presenters: Valère Awouters, Dries Palmaers and Veerle Schuyten, Katholieke Hogeschool Limburg, Hasselt, Belgium
Lecture. Target audience: General; Higher education
In this project Facebook is used to inform future students of the teacher training college. We started a group on Facebook where current and former students and teachers give a realistic image of studying at the teacher training college: the members of the group post comments, pictures, videos…
On Facebook there is a link to a website that allows future students to test the level of their native language. They can also make exercises in order to be well prepared when they start studying.
We give special attention to boys and immigrant students because they are underrepresented in the teacher training college. In this way we want to use facebook as a social learning network, supporting informal learning.

F5 Economic stability for inclusion by using paraprofessionals in education
Presenters: Nancy K. French, PhD, Para Educator Training Resources, Colorado, USA, and Ann Morrison Clement, PhD, Colorado, USA
Lecture. Target audience: Pre-school/primary school; Secondary/upper secondary school.
Education for sustainable development must consider economic efficacy when developing models for inclusion of students. A conceptual framework which focuses on the hiring, training, and employment of paraprofessionals will be proposed which can provide for long term stability for students, staff and schools.
The goal of the session is to provide knowledge from an economic perspective regarding theory, research, training and best classroom practices of how to implement a model for economic stability in an inclusive program.

F6 Yes we can! How to become a committed leader for ESD
Presenters: Mathias Dementriades and Anna Lindahl, The Global School, Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: Pre-school/Primary school; Secondary/upper secondary school; Adult education
This seminar shows how The Global School addresses leaders and teachers in various municipalities so that they come on board and realize the significance of ESD and urgency to act. The mandate for ESD is discussed for instance in Swedish curriculum and other central national and international documents such as the Millennium Development Goals.

PARALLEL SESSIONS
SATURDAY 29 JANUARY at 15.30 – 16.30

G1 How pupils explore their lifestyles and their approach to sustainable development
Presenters: Michaela Leitner and Anja Christanell, the Austrian Institute for Sustainable Development, Vienna, Austria
Lecture/paper. Target audience: Secondary and Upper secondary schools
In the project “MY LIFE – MY STYLE – MY FUTURE” pupils of two 6th forms of two Viennese schools analysed their own lifestyles and those of other teenagers by using social research methods. This paper presents insights in juvenile lifestyles and in quantitative and qualitative results of the pupils’ (self-)exploration. It highlights how the teenagers became aware of differences in lifestyles, what they learned about (the connection of their lifestyle to) sustainability and how they expressed their own ideas about sustainability via social media and graphic design.

G2 /No session/

G3 The leadership role of the principal in inclusionary practice
Presenters: Ann Morrison Clement, Educational Consultant, Colorado, USA
Lecture. Target audience: Pre-school/ Primary school
The principal must create a leadership role in the school in order for students with special needs to be included in the regular classroom. The leadership role needs to focus on the following areas: philosophy, laws, best practices, systemic organization, staff and parent training, and adaptation and modification of standards, curriculum and materials.
The principal can develop a conceptual framework to integrate research and theory, best educational practices, and personal and professional development into a model for sustainable development for students, teachers and parents.

G4 Can transformational learning enhance leadership in schools?
Presenter: Francia Kinchington, School of Education and Training, the University of Greenwich, England UK
Lecture. Target audience: General
This session explores how ideas about Transformational Learning can make a positive contribution to the learning and development of school leaders, supporting their evolution from novice to expert practitioners. It will explore the role of experience in a dynamic and changing educational field characterised by conflicting tensions, examining the contribution and learning that emerge from critical incidents; critical reflection; affective learning and sustained post graduate professional development, drawing them together to show their impact on shaping leaders’ learning, understanding and identity.

G5 Learning by walking. A model for sustainable field trip learning
Presenter: Anna Mogren, The Global School, Sweden
Workshop. Target audience: General
Learning through immersion into everyday circumstances in rural life. Staying with a village family, spending your days slowly walking around in the local rural setting is a very efficient model for learning about the reality for hundreds of millions of people. The example of The Global Journey to Bangladesh is exposed.

G6 Generations Up! How generations work and learn
Presenter: Roxana Mocanu, ITOL Institute of Training and Occupational Learning, Romania
Workshop. Target audience: General.
Generations Up! 1. How do various generations co-exist in the organizations? 2. How do they learn and work together? 3. What are the success receipts? 4. Why do generations misunderstand each? 5. Creating a winning strategy. The topic is based on a research made by CIPD, the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development and HBR Harvard Business Review on international level, and by ITOL Central Eastern Europe on a local level.

POSTER PRESENTATION
SATURDAY 29 JANUARY

Customer Guided Services’ Quality Assurance Methodology for Rural Extension
Presenter: Gunta Grinberga-Zalite, Latvia University of Agriculture, Latvia
Knowledge and timely access to information are significant preconditions for the life quality of rural population. Rural extension centres have an important role in the rural and agricultural development, as they facilitate profitability and competitiveness of the farms reducing rural population’s dependence on support payments in scope of the national support policy.
In the present situation, when the effectiveness of the national budget subsidies’ use is especially activated, it is important to search for possibilities how to make reasonable use of rural advisory centres’ resources.
The poster describes methodology for the evaluation of rural extension services and presents authors’ adopted composite model for the assurance of customer guided services’ quality.

Other papers available at the conference

PAPER PRESENTATIONS
in addition to conference sessions

PP1 Classification of Researches towards a Consolidated Typology of Leadership Studies
Authors: Prof. Malek Elahi and Jamal Ansari, Holy Angel University, Metro Manila, the Philippines
Paper
Researches are classifiable according to the following:
a) The three decision-making phases, of exploratory, conclusive, and performance-monitoring researches (Classification of Researches, according to PURPOSE)
b) The method of data collection-and-analysis (Classification of Researches, according to METHOD)
c) The APPLICATION of the research as to whether its for any of the following:
i) Action research, ii) Evaluation research, iii) Dissertation/thesis writing
This paper recommends a synergistic convergence of the three classifications which results in a fourth typology of researches as follows:
i) Experimental Research
ii) Causal-Comparative Research
iii) Case study
iv) Content analysis
v) Correlational Research
vi) Historical Research

PP2 “NEED OF THE HOUR”
Authors: Vidhyalakshmi S, Meenu S, Shaju Raj, Mritunjay Kumar,Amrita School of Business, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kerala State, India
Paper
India being one of the largest consumers of OIL, also owns the Largest OIL refinery in the World: Reliance Industries Limited. The total refining capacity in the country as on 1.10.2009 stands at 179.956 MMTPA.

As part India’s 11th 5-Year Plan (2007-2012), the government wants to strongly increase the oil refinery capacity and to promote India as a competitive refining destination so that India can become a net exporter of refined products to Asia in the near future.

Peak oil is the point in time when the maximum rate of global petroleum extraction is reached. Statistics says that the world has reached peak Oil, but India is now planning to build new Oil refineries with huge investments. It’s high time to think about other alternative sources rather than investing in Oil refineries which is at Peak level. Government should invest in alternate renewable sources of energy so that India need not depend on oil of Middle East. Alternate renewable sources can be solar, wind, nuclear, Biofuel and everything else our imagination except OIL.

The use of alternative clean fuels could help control the pollution of fossil fuel use as well as mitigate global warming. The rebuilding of local food networks, energy production, and the general implementation of ‘energy descent culture’ are argued to be ethical responses to the acknowledgment of finite fossil resources.

Download the 2011 Berlin Conference Brochure here.